Back to IndieWire

You’re Gonna Love Me

You're Gonna Love Me

dreamgirlsjh460.jpg

Here at Reverse Shot, we care about keeping you up-to-date on all the hottest buzz — after all, that’s our job; we are film critics!– and so we scraped and saved and sent one of our own (yours truly!) to the hotttest ticket in town (that’s 3 t’s and 4 stars, if you’re counting!): the $25 all exclusive screening of Dreamgirls! And let me tell you: the Ziegfeld hasn’t shook from applause like this since the Liza with a Z screening last March!

Okay, in all seriousness, Liza with a Z is the best thing ever. As for Dreamgirls, well… Never mind the nonexistent screenplay or the facile approach to its subject, the biggest problem with Dreamgirls is that the musical numbers — the disappointing music, the apologetic staging (as if writer-director Bill Condon wants to insist, “Look, they’re singing, but it’s okay, because now they’re onstage!”)–are utterly boring and forgettable. It’s no wonder people are so effusive about Jennifer Hudson; at least it feels like something is happening when she’s onscreen. And let me join the chorus. Hudson is something truly special (her performance of “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going”, owing exclusively to her considerable talent, was among the most devastating moments of cinema I experienced all year), but she’s certainly not perfect — she can sing, and she can act, but every time she’s called upon to speak…

Anyway. So Hudson’s the best thing about a bad (or at least really boring) movie, but still, the Dreamgirls hype reproduces itself. Why are people paying $25 to see this thing? Wait, better question: why did I pay $25 to see this thing? And the worst part of all is that hype begets more hype. Create an event, and people will go. They’ll pay their $25, applaud (hell, they even cheered Beyonce), and go home and tell their friends they have to see Dreamgirls. It’s brilliant marketing. In fact, it’s the only brilliant thing about Dreamgirls.

This Article is related to: Uncategorized and tagged