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Langston Hughes African American Film Fest Returns April 14 (“Restless City,” “The Last Fall,” “Mooz-lum,” + More)

Langston Hughes African American Film Fest Returns April 14 ("Restless City," "The Last Fall," "Mooz-lum," + More)

The Langston Hughes African American Film Festival returns to Seattle, WA, next week with Matthew Cherry’s tale of redemption for a sports star, The Last Fall, as its opening night film. The festival, which runs April 14-22 at the Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center, includes over 20 features, many of which we’ve discussed at length on this site.

Feature film highlights include Nicole Beharie starrer My Last Day Without You, Qasim Basir’s Mooz-lum, LGBT-themed musical Leave it on the Floor, as well as NYADFF hits An Uncommon Woman and The Story of Lover’s Rock. As an official AFFRM festival, LHAAFF will also feature Andrew Dosunmu’s Restless City as its closing night film.

Documentary selections of note include Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years 1984 to 1992 and Andre Lee’s profile of blacks with elite educations, The Prep School Negro. Also in the shorts section is Brooklyn prison drama The Tombs, by recent ABC/DGA directing program finalist Jerry LaMothe.

Find the complete festival lineup below. For more details and tickets, visit Brown Paper Tickets.

OPENING NIGHT – SATURDAY, APRIL 14

THE LAST FALL

Matthew Cherry (USA, 2012) 90 minutes. English. Genre: narrative.

Filmmaker and former NFL player Matthew Cherry will be on hand to open the 2012 Langston Hughes African American Film Festival™ with his new film, THE LAST FALL.Cherry got his start as a filmmaker 2007 on the CW show Girlfriends after retiring from the NFL (playing for the Jaguars, Bengals, Panthers and Ravens). From there he transitioned into directing music videos for the likes of Jazmine Sullivan, Kindred The Family Soul, Snoop Dogg and Bilal. This is Cherry’s first feature film.

THE LAST FALL is a provocative film starring Lance Gross and Nichole Beharie. A post screening discussion and reception will be part of the opening night festivities.

Saturday, April 14 at 6:00 p.m. $20 general admission includes reception

SUNDAY APRIL 15

2PM -LGBT Family & Friends

AUDRE LORDE-THE BERLIN YEARS 1984 to 1992

Dagmar Schultz (Germany, 2012) 84 minutes.  English and German with English subtitles.  Genre: documentary.

This film demonstrates how noted theorist, essayist, poet, and lesbian activist Audre Lorde’s ideas about human differences inspired the development of a Black German movement and the growth of consciousness around racism among white women—a subject few people outside of Germany are aware of. The project is a very timely one given the renewed US-EU struggles against racism and around race and ethnic integration.  Audre Lorde’s work and legacy are central to US-German cross-cultural exchanges and coalition building in the context of the Black diaspora.  Washington State Premiere

Screens with:

T’AINT NOBODYS BUSINESS: THE GIFT OF FAMILY

A’INT I A WOMAN

Ticket purchases: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/239144

4PM

THE OTHER SIDE OF SILENCE: THE UNTOLD STORY OF RUBY McCOLLUM

Claudia Hunter Johnson (USA, 2010)  80 minutes.  English. Genre: documentary.

A wealthy black woman. Her abusive white doctor. The diagnosis was murder.

This feature documentary chronicles Pulitzer Prize Nominee Claudia Hunter Johnson’s 19-year quest to unravel a crazy quilt of corruption, hatred, violence and injustice. In 1952 the richest black woman in Live Oak, Florida was sentenced to the electric chair for murdering a prominent white physician and state-senator-elect — her alleged lover.

Sunday, April 15 at 4:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

7PM

THE PREP SCHOOL NEGRO

Andre Lee (USA, 2011)  60 minutes.  English. Genre: documentary.

André Robert Lee and his sister grew up in the ghettos of Philadelphia. Their mother struggled to support them by putting strings in the waistbands of track pants and swimsuits in a local factory. When Andre was 14 years old, he received what his family believed to be a golden ticket – a full scholarship to attend one of the most prestigious prep schools in the country.  Elite education was Andre’s way up and out, but at what price?  Yes, the exorbitant tuition was covered, but this new world cost him and his family much more than anyone could have anticipated.

CONTRADICTIONS OF FAIR HOPE

S. Epatha Merkerson (USA, 2012)  67 minutes.  English.  Genre: documentary.

There is a heaven side and a hell side: which side will you be on?  July 1865. Over 4 million slaves have been freed. Forced to roam the antebellum countryside, many of them are ill prepared and unable to cope with the realities of their newfound freedom. This documentary examines a little known aspect of American history, when newly freed slaves throughout the South formed “benevolent societies” to respond to the abject hunger, illness and the fear of a pauper’s grave.

The documentary, narrated by Whoopi Goldberg, sets the stage in rural Alabama, prior to Emancipation, and traces the development, struggles, contributions and gradual loss of tradition of one of the last remaining African American benevolent societies, known as “The Fair Hope Benevolent Society” in Uniontown, Alabama.

Through gripping human stories of some of the last surviving society members and interviews with historians and local residents, the film provides an unprecedented look at the complex and morally ambiguous world of Fair Hope juxtaposed against the worldly pleasures of what has become known as the annual “Foot Wash” celebration.

Sunday, April 15 at 7:00 p.m. $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

9PM

FAMBUL TOK

Sara Terry  (Sierra Leone / USA, 2011) 82 minutes.  Krio and English, with English subtitles.  Genre: documentary

Fambul Tok tells the story of healing in post-conflict Sierra Leone through the intimate stories of perpetrators and victims, including:

Esther and Joseph – family members who were caught in the horrors of the war. At age 12 Esther was captured by rebels, and raped by 15 men. Among them was her uncle, Joseph. He, too, had been caught by the rebels and ordered to rape Esther – or be killed.

Sahr and Nyumah – best friends whose lives were forever changed by the conflict. Rebel forces turned the two boys on each other, forcing Nyumah to beat his best friend so severely that he crippled him – and then forcing him to cut the throat of his best friend’s father.

The villagers of Foendor and Tamba Joe, the native son who killed and beheaded 17 members of his own clan.

Victims and perpetrators of Sierra Leone’s brutal civil war come together for the first time in an unprecedented program of tradition-based truth-telling and forgiveness ceremonies. Through reviving their ancient practice of fambul tok (family talk), Sierra Leoneans are building sustainable peace at the grass-roots level – succeeding where the international community’s post-conflict efforts failed. Filled with lessons for the West, this film explores the depths of a culture that believes that true justice lies in redemption and healing for individuals – and that forgiveness is the surest path to restoring dignity and building strong communities.

Sunday, April 15 at 9:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

MONDAY APRIL 16

1PM

THE NEXT DAY

Alfred Robbins.  (USA, 2011).  81 minutes.  English.  Genre: narrative.

Will and Desireé meet at a bar and have a one night stand.  Three months later, Desireé shows up at Will’s house to tell him that she’s pregnant.  He doesn’t believe that the child is his because of the way they met.  Seattle Premiere

Screens with:

JUNIOR AND THE SAINT

Monday, April 16 at 1:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Senior Citizens.

4PM – SELECTED SHORTS PROGRAM

THE MARK

KEEPER OF THE FLAME

THADDEUS MOSELY SCULPTOR

JUNIOR AND THE SAINT

THE GREAT INCARCERATOR

7PM

DIMANCHE A BRAZZAVILLE

Enric Bach  (2011, 51 minutes) French, Lingala, Teké with English subtitles.  Genre: documentary.

Insight into the lives and style of sapeurs, magic-wielding wrestlers, political hip hop artists, and a politically engaged radio DJ in Congo.  A young radio talk host, Carlos La Menace, unveils in his weekend show three figures of Congo’s capital, Brazzaville. The Sapeur Yves Saint Laurent, surrounded by extreme poverty, chooses elegance as a way of life. Cheriff Bakala is not a usual rapper. Mixes hip hop with Congolese folk, and uses local instruments, such as drums made up with water cans. He’s about to record his first album in a country with almost no producers. Finally, Palmas Yaya, Brazzaville’s wrestling champion is relying on magic to defend its throne in a crucial moment of his life.

Monday, April 16 at 7:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

9PM – SELECTED SHORTS PROGRAM

THANK YOU FOR WASHING

KARMA THE MOVIE

ODESSA

MIKEL’S FAITH

TUESDAY APRIL 17

1PM

AN UNCOMMON WOMAN Une Femme Pas Comme les Autres

Dao Abdoulaye (Burkina Faso, 2009). 101 minutes.  French with English subtitles.  Genre: Social Comedy.

Mina is tired of her husband’s infidelity and decides to take a drastic decision: She takes a second husband. Based on his conversations with women involved in polygamist relationships, he illustrates – to very funny effects – the daily life of two persons – in this case two men – who share a spouse. On a comedic tone, Abdoulaye Dao tells us a story of jealousy, infidelity, romance and revenge.  An Uncommon Woman-Une Femme Pas Comme Les Autres- was a success in its native Burkina Faso and is cast with some the best actors of Burkinabe cinema.

Tuesday, April 17 at 1:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

4PM – YOUTH SHOWCASE

A variety of films that are by, for or about young people.

SHOWTIME

Ben Guest  (USA, 2011)  60 minutes.  English.  Genre: documentary.

The friendship of four young Black women from rural Mississippi trying to win a basketball state championship.

Screens with

SULE AND THE CASE OF THE TINY SPARKS;

BSIDE MYSELF

LOOKING AT THE STARS

Tuesday, April 17, 4:00 p.m. $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

7PM

WE ARE NOT GHOSTS

Melissa Young and Mark Dworkin  (USA, 2012)  52 minutes and 30 seconds.  English. Genre: documentary feature.

Fifty years ago, Detroit was famous as the motor city, where 2 million hard working people were living the American dream.  Then the auto industry fell on hard times, and so did Detroit.  Most people moved a way: neighborhoods turned into wastelands.  But some have a vision for a new Detroit as a human scaled city for a post industrial era.  And they are starting to make it real.  Includes an interview with community activist Grace Lee Boggs.

Post screening discussion with filmmakers Melissa Young and Mark Dworkin

Tuesday, April 17 at 7:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

9PM

CONTRADICTIONS OF FAIR HOPE

S. Epatha Merkerson (USA, 2012)  67 minutes.  English.  Genre: documentary.

There is a heaven side and a hell side: which side will you be on?  July 1865. Over 4 million slaves have been freed. Forced to roam the antebellum countryside, many of them are ill prepared and unable to cope with the realities of their newfound freedom. This documentary examines a little known aspect of American history, when newly freed slaves throughout the South formed “benevolent societies” to respond to the abject hunger, illness and the fear of a pauper’s grave.

The documentary, narrated by Whoopi Goldberg, sets the stage in rural Alabama, prior to Emancipation, and traces the development, struggles, contributions and gradual loss of tradition of one of the last remaining African American benevolent societies, known as “The Fair Hope Benevolent Society” in Uniontown, Alabama.

Through gripping human stories of some of the last surviving society members and interviews with historians and local residents, the film provides an unprecedented look at the complex and morally ambiguous world of Fair Hope juxtaposed against the worldly pleasures of what has become known as the annual “Foot Wash” celebration.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 18

1PM

TRUE GODS HAVE BONES / Los Dioses Veridad Tienen Huesos

David Alfaro, Belén Santos, and Marta Moreno  (Guinea Bissau/Portugual, 2011)  90 minutes.  Creole, Portuguese, English, Spanish with English subtitles.  Genre: documentary.

Life in Guinea Bissau is difficult because it is one of the poorest countries on earth. Children with severe health problems have to be evacuated to Europe as their only chance for survival. The day-today lives of 5 people of different races, beliefs & backgrounds (including a Black doctor from Guinea Bissau) reveal the complications of carrying out these evacuations. These difficulties are caused by bureaucracy & political instability.   Seattle Premiere

Wednesday, April 18 at 1:00 p.m. $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

4PM – Youth Teen Showcase

Films by, for or about young people

MISS DIVINE

HARRIET RETURNS

JUNIOR AND THE SAINT

THE MARK

ODESSA

KARMA

7PM – LADIES NIGHT PART I

GOOD HAIR AND OTHER DUBIOUS DISTINCITIONS

Camille S. DeBose  (USA, 2011) 34 minutes.  English.  Genre: documentary.

The film focuses on cultural language and practices that negatively impact the development of a healthy sense of self. The filmmaker’s commentary asserts a criticism of the way wavy hair, lighter skin and a slender nose are still considered more attractive in the black community in light of historical and contemporary movements which have sought to liberate black self esteem. As a practicing and teaching sociologist the filmmaker sought to illuminate the notion of symbolic violence through the lens of Pierre Bourdieu and spark conversation not just in the black community but all other communities as well. Cultural practices which value some features but not others are issues common to every family and every community. For the filmmaker this is an issue of valuing and finding beauty in every human being.

EBONY GODDESS QUEEN OF ILE AIYE

Carolina Moraes-Liu (Brazil, 2010).  20 minutes.  Portuguese

with English subtitles.  Genre: documentary.

EBONY GODDESS: QUEEN OF ILÊ AIYÊ follows three women competing to be the carnival queen of Ilê Aiyê, a prominent and controversial Afro-Brazilian group with an all-black membership. The selection is based on Afro-centric notions of beauty, in counterpoint to prevailing standards of beauty in Brazil, a country famous for slim supermodels and plastic surgery. Contestants for the title of Ebony Goddess dress in flowing African-style garments, gracefully performing traditional Afro-Brazilian dances to songs praising the beauty of black women.

For Aurelina, Joseane and Talita, the competition for the title of Ebony Goddess is part of a profound and personal search for identity and self-esteem. The figure of the Ebony Goddess, representing a “black is beautiful” view of black women, resonates with women of African descent in Brazil, the United States and throughout the world of the African Diaspora.

Cultural commentary presented by anthropologist and professor emerita of The Evergreen State College, Dr. Angela Gilliam.

Screens with:

MISS DIVINE

THANK YOU FOR WASHING

Wednesday, April 18 at 7:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

9PM – LADIES NIGHT PART II

MY LAST DAY WITHOUT YOU

Stefan Schaefer (USA,2011) 92 minutes. English, German.  Genre: narrative (romantic comedy)

When a young business executive, NIKLAS (28), is sent from Frankfurt to New York to shut down a division of his firm, he doesn’t realize his life is about to be turned upside-down in one single day. By 9:30am he has done what he was tasked to do. But his flight back to Frankfurt doesn’t leave for another 11 hours. In this time, seemingly by chance, he meets and falls for LETICIA (25), a beautiful African-American secretary and aspiring singer. The only problem…unbeknownst to him, she’s one of the people he just fired. They end up back in Brooklyn, where he meets her father, a pastor, and begins to realize who she is. Unable to tell her the truth, he stumbles through a romantic few hours of eating, walking through Brooklyn streets, and listening to her play music in her new apartment.

In the same vein as cross-cultural love stories such as BEFORE SUNRISE (1995) and ONCE (2006), MY LAST DAY WITHOUT YOU mines the humor and conflict that arises when two individuals – seemingly so different – are thrown together by a force they fight but ultimately cannot control…love.

Wednesday, April 18 at 9:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19

1PM

SHOWTIME

Ben Guest  (USA, 2011)  60 minutes.  English.  Genre: documentary.

The friendship of four young Black women from rural Mississippi trying to win a basketball state championship.

Screens with:

GOOD HAIR AND OTHER DUBIOUS DISTINCTIONS

4PM

THE TOMBS

Jerry LaMothe   English.  Genre: narrative.

A Brooklyn mom’s three day journey through New York’s infamous jail system known as the Tombs.  Seattle Premiere

Screens with:

THE CHRISTMAS TREE

LOOKING AT THE STARS

JUNIOR AND THE SAINT

7PM

MOOZ-LUM

Qasim Basir.  (USA, 2011)  English.  Genre: narrative.

MOOZ-lum is the story of a black family within the first large generation of Muslims born and raised in this country and the trials and tribulations faced while practicing Islamic faith in American Society.

The story is told through the eyes of Tariq Mahdi, a young man born and raised in a Muslim household along with his younger sister Taqua by their father Hassan and mother Safiyah. Hassan is determined to send Tariq to an Islamic school to learn the Quran, which Safiyah strongly objects to. When Hassan’s strict beliefs become too much for Safiyah’s liberal nature, she decides that she wants a divorce. Little do Tariq and Taqua know, the terms of the divorce are Tariq is to live with their father and Taqua with their mother. After the divorce, Hassan fulfills his plans for Tariq and sends him off to an Islamic boarding school.

Just as Tariq begins to grow as a person and open up to new ideas about his faith, the attacks on the World Trade Center take place. Immediately, the view of Muslims in America changes and some people begin to act on their anti-Islamic feelings. Their campus becomes an environment surrounded by violence and hate crimes.

At that moment, Tariq must make many critical decisions with his life, from dealing with a Muslim/Christian relationship he has with a young lady named Ayanna, trying to deal with the views of Islam that he knows while separating it from the ones created by 9/11, all while trying to protect Taqua from the dangers building on campus due to that tragic day.

Post screening discussion with Filmmaker Qasim Basir

Thursday, April 17 at 7:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

9PM

STOMPING ON THE DEVIL’S HEAD

Malik Isasis  (USA, 2010/2011)  100 minutes.  English.  Genre: documentary.

Jennifer Rosario, an Afro-Dominican examines her own personal journey of being a black Latina and embracing an Afro-centric identity. Stomping on the Devil’s Head captures the pathos of black men and women’s individual, and collective journeys.  Seattle Premiere

Thursday, April 19 at 9:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

FRIDAY, APRIL 20

1PM

MOUNTAINS THAT TAKE WING: ANGELA DAVIS AND YURI KOCHIAMA

C.A. Griffith and H.L.T Quan (USA, 2012)  97 minutes.  English.  Genre: documentary.

This inspiring documentary spans thirteen years between two women who share a passion for justice. Through intimate conversations, we learn about Davis, an internationally renowned scholar-activist and 88-year-old Kochiyama, a revered grassroots community activist and 2005 Nobel Peace Prize nominee. Their shared experience as political prisoners and their dedication to Civil Rights embody personal and political experiences as well as the diverse lives of women doing liberatory cultural work.

Friday, April 20 at 1:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

4PM

TRUE GODS HAVE BONES / Los Dioses Veridad Tienen Huesos

David Alfaro, Belén Santos, and Marta Moreno  (Guinea Bissau/Portugual, 2011)  90 minutes.  Creole, Portuguese, English, Spanish with English subtitles.  Genre: documentary.

Life in Guinea Bissau is difficult because it is one of the poorest countries on earth. Children with severe health problems have to be evacuated to Europe as their only chance for survival. The day-today lives of 5 people of different races, beliefs & backgrounds (including a Black doctor from Guinea Bissau) reveal the complications of carrying out these evacuations. These difficulties are caused by bureaucracy & political instability.   Seattle Premiere

Friday, April 20 at 4:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

7PM

LEAVE IT ON THE FLOOR

Sheldon Larry.  (USA, 2011)  107 minutes.  Genre: musical narrative, LGBT

Leave It On the Floor tells the story of Brad, our hero, who is thrown out of his dysfunctional home by his mother, Deondra. He steals his mother’s car and travels into Los Angeles where, through a chance encounter, Brad, a little like Alice in Wonderland, stumbles into a noisy raucous, chaotic event and meets the ragtag members of the struggling House of Eminence. Initially only looking for a place to sleep(and perhaps someone to sleep with), Brad ends up engaging with the colorful members of the house led by the indomitable house mother Queef Latina, herself an aging ball-legend and the fierce protectrice of her family. Laughter, tears, sex sirens, and butch queens up in pumps ensue and remarkably, Brad ends up finding an extraordinary home and loving, caring family in this, the strangest of places.

Friday, April 20 at 7:00 p.m.   $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

9PM

AUDRE LORDE-THE BERLIN YEARS 1984 to 1992

Dagmar Schultz (Germany, 2012) 84 minutes.  English and German with English subtitles.  Genre: documentary.

This film demonstrates how noted theorist, essayist, poet, and lesbian activist Audre Lorde’s ideas about human differences inspired the development of a Black German movement and the growth of consciousness around racism among white women—a subject few people outside of Germany are aware of. The project is a very timely one given the renewed US-EU struggles against racism and around race and ethnic integration.  Audre Lorde’s work and legacy are central to US-German cross-cultural exchanges and coalition building in the context of the Black diaspora.  Washington State Premiere

April 20, 9PM  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

SATURDAY, APRIL 21

11 AM

FILMMAKER PANEL BRUNCH

Northwest African American Museum

2300 SOUTH MASSACHUSETTS ST SEATTLE, WA 98144

“Lyrical Storytelling…Word, Sound, Power;  Film, Music and the Future”

A dialogue with the collaborative artists who are pushing and redefining the reach of new media and audio visual story telling. Making accessible collaborative art films masked as music videos complimenting some of the world’s most fearless musical artists. These often short offerings serve as much more than creative marketing. They re-imagine and deconstruct  the past and paint a  poetic fearless future.

Panelist include but are not limited to Seattle’s own Maikoyo Alley-Barnes and his work with Shabaaz  Palaces, Shawn Peters of the MVMNT collective and his work with PhAroh Monch and Andrew Dosunmu. This discussion would explore the visions of these collaborations (the fashion designers/ musicians/ cinematographers/ painters/) and the freedoms and challenges that come with their experience.

April 21 at 11am. $8 general, $5 youth and Senior Citizens

(please note, this event is not included in LangstonPass package)

1PM

CULTURAL RECONNECTION

Nia Arunga  (USA, 2010)  60 minutes.  English.  Genre: documentary.  Local filmmaker.

(synopsis forthcoming)

Saturday, April 21 at 1:00 p.m. $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

4PM

ZANZIBAR DANCE, TRANCE, & DEVOTION: AN ANTHOLOGY OF ZANZIBARI DANCES ON FILM

Tamalyn Dallal  (Tanzania/USA, 2011)  80 minutes.  KiSwahili songs lyrics with English subtitles and English voice-over.  Genre: documentary.

A collection of vibrant dance and music of interest to scholars, dancers and others. Dallal documented a group of former clove farmers from the island of Pemba as they showed the rarely seen dances of harvest, rhythmic stick fighting, and others that called forth the spirits. She traveled to villages, filming a tribe of matrilineal women, a village that attributes their good fortune to an 800 year old spiritual practice, and another where they incorporate pantomime with drumming while wearing vintage sunglasses and military uniforms.

Post screening discussion with filmmaker Tamalyn Dalla

Saturday, April 21 at 4:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

7PM

THE STORY OF LOVER’S ROCK

Menelik Shabazz  (United Kingdom/Great Britain, 2011)  96 minutes.  English.  Genre: documentary.

Lovers Rock, often dubbed ‘romantic reggae’ is a uniquely black British sound that developed in the late 70s and 80s against a backdrop of riots, racial tension and sound systems. Live performance, comedy sketches, dance, interviews and archive shed light on the music and the generation that embraced it. Lovers Rock allowed young people to experience intimacy and healing through dance- known as ‘scrubbing’- at parties and clubs. This dance provided a coping mechanism for what was happening on the streets. Lovers Rock developed into a successful sound with national UK hits and was influential to British bands (Police, Culture Club, UB40) These influences underline the impact the music was making in bridging the multi-cultural gap that polarized the times. The film sheds light on a forgotten period of British music, social and political history.

Screens with:

BESIDE MYSELF

Saturday, April 21 at 7:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

9PM

TWO GUYS AT THE BACK OF THE THEATER – THE AUDIENCE TALKS BACK

Seattle get ready! It’s your turn to talk back to the movies! This screening will feature some of our favorite Black classic films and YOU! That’s right, on this night we will host films that we all know and love…and TALK OUT LOUD without getting shushed! Films like, UPTOWN SATURDAY NIGHT, SPARKLE, DO THE RIGHT THING and more!

Get ready to have a good old time and provide your own commentary as the films screen.

Screens with:

ODESSA

Saturday, April 21 at 9PM. $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

1PM

WALK WITH ME

Tanisha Christie and Ellie Walton  (USA, 2012).  English.  Genre: documentary.

Against the backdrop of historical moments of social change, Walk With Me follows three women who use theater to inspire, stir and animate our democracy. While at work in prisons, schools, and community centers, the film reveals that one person – one artist – can make a difference.

Walk With Me is an expressionistic journey capturing artists who are sharing the creative process of performance and the people who are unexpectedly deeply moved by the experience.  The film is a tribute to the legacy of arts activism showing that performance touches hearts by offering us a chance to actively experience our own humanity for personal and hopefully communal transformation.

Post screening discussion with filmmaker Tanisha Christie and Ellie Watson.

Sunday, April 22 at 1:00 p.m.  $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

4PM

A LOT LIKE YOU

Eliaichi Kimaro (USA/Tanzania, 2011)  81 minutes.  Swahili, Kichagga and English, with subtitles.  Genre: documentary.  Local filmmaker.

A lot like you raises questions about the cultures we choose to pass down and reveals how simply bearing witness to another’s suffering can break silences that have lasted lifetimes. Seattle-based filmmaker Eliaichi Kimaro is a mixed-race, first-generation American with a Tanzanian father and Korean mother.  When Eli was older and in an interracial relationship of her own, she wanted to better understand this world her father had left behind when he was 18.  When Dr. Kimaro retired and moved back to Tanzania for good, Eli followed him to make a film about this culture she would one day pass down to her own children.

Post screening discussion with filmmaker Eliaichi Kimaro

Screens with

SULE AND THE CASE OF THE TINY SPARKS

Sunday, April 22 at 4:00 p.m. $8 general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

7PM

RESTLESS CITY

Andrew Dosunmu  (USA, 2012)  English.  Genre: narrative.

Nigerian born director Andrew Dosunmu’s RESTLESS CITY struggles to reconcile the sky-high promises of the American Dream with the gritty reality of life in New York. Walking a fine line between the city’s sensuous illusions and its grim truths, RESTLESS CITY is an immigrant’s love story to Harlem: its bustling streets, its inherent danger and its potent sexuality.

Dosunmu’s feature-length debut combines stylized cinematography with a phenomenal soundtrack to produce something quite wonderful.

Djibril (Alassane Sy) is a young Senegalese immigrant trying to make a life for himself in the unforgiving streets of Harlem, sticking around in theh big city in hope of kicking off his recording career. In the meantime, he dabbles in small jobs, selling CDs on the street and acting as a courier on his moped. But when a meeting with beautiful, vulnerable Trini (Sky Grey) in pimp Bekay’s apartment, changes his life forever.

Reception and discussion with filmmaker Andrew Dosunmu included in ticket price.

Sunday, April 22 at 7:00 p.m.  $20general, $5 Youth and Senior Citizens.

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