New Images From Experimental Drama ‘Hogtown’ Set During 1919 Chicago Race Riots

New Images From Experimental Drama 'Hogtown' Set During 1919 Chicago Race Riots

Here’s a project that Sergio first profiled back in April; an experimental black-and-white feature film set during the 1919 Chicago race riots that we’re curious about and eagerly anticipating.

To recap, Hogtown, helmed by Chicago area writer/director Daniel Nearing (2009’s Chicago Heights), stars Herman Wilkins and Diandra Lyle playing the leads in a mutli-racial cast of more than 70. Close to finishing production, Hogtown incorportates several iconic figures including a young unplished Ernest Hemingway.
According to Nearing, the film will be “period-less;” he oped to shoot Hogtown in undisguised Chicago locations, hence the experimental quality.

Hogtown is scheduled for a 2013 release. The soundtrack will include original gospel songs by Minister Raymond Dunlap (Chicago Heights) and a full orchestral score is in the works. Hopefully we’ll get to see some footage soon.

Here’s a full synopsis:

“Hogtown” is a feature-length dramatic study of the soul of the Chicagoan. The film is set in 1919 against the backdrop of the race riots of that year, the end of WWI, and the Black Sox scandal. Its plot relates to the investigation into the disappearance of a millionaire theatre owner during a snowstorm. While it is both a murder mystery and a love story, it is also experimental at every turn, and celebrates the city while exploring the isolation and emotions of many of its inhabitants. This will sound like hyperbole, but it’s not: the film may be the most ambitious Chicago story ever made. This period piece is much more a period-less piece, shot in black and white in undisguised contemporary Chicago and incorporating neoclassical motifs. The film involves a multi-racial, ensemble cast of more than 50 characters and evolves directly from the ensemble process of the making our previous feature, Chicago Heights.

Take a look at the ntriguing stills from the film’s climactic scenes below, which were posted on the film’s Facebook this evening. Click on HERE to view the full set.

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Comments

Adam Scott Thompson

High for this.

Micah

Intriguing indeed. I'm curious about the process they used to develop the story. It's funny, in the early part of the last century there where more expire tap films than people remember. This still from this film remind me of that time period for obvious reasons. This could be a very daring endeavor. I hope it succeeds.

Jeremy

gorgeous

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