The To Do List

The To Do List

A bright cast
and a promising comedy premise don’t entirely pay off in Maggie Carey’s feature
debut as writer and director, The To Do
. How much you like it will largely depend on your tolerance for
verbally and visually graphic sex jokes. But even a generous viewer may have to
admit that the film runs out of steam before it reaches the finale—a flaw it
shares with far too many recent comedies.

Aubrey Plaza
delivers an engaging performance as a 1993 high-school graduate who’s been so busy
getting A’s and student citations that she’s ignored her social life completely.
At graduation, her best pals (the winning twosome of Alia Shawkat and Sarah
Steele) make it their mission to loosen her up at a wild party. She gets drunk
for the first time and sets eyes on a guitar-strumming dreamboat named Rusty
Waters (Scott Porter). Being the compulsive type she is, Plaza develops a
checklist of sexual deeds she wants to experience before the end of
summer—culminating in intercourse with Rusty. This being 1993, she can’t get
the answers she seeks from Google, so she sets out to learn all she can
first-hand (no pun intended).

characters include Plaza’s parents, a sexually liberated mom (Connie Britton)
and an uptight dad (Clark Gregg), her provocative older sister (Rachel Bilson),
a woeful study pal who pines for her (Johnny Simmons), and a stoner (Bill
Hader) who’s her boss at the community pool. Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Donald
Glover, and Andy Samberg also appear in the lively ensemble.

little ground that hasn’t been covered before in (mostly) funnier movies from a
male point of view. Carey’s female perspective is the main novelty, offering
further proof (if any was needed) that women can deliver smutty gags as
effectively as men. What wonderful times we live in.

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Daniel Delago

It's too bad the film wasn't actually shot in Boise, Idaho where writer/director Maggie Carey actually grow up in the early '90s. You're absolutely correct, the film does lose steam. What the film succeeds in doing is showing that indie darling Aubrey Plaza can carry a feature film. She's definitely talented and fun to watch.

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