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Rudd and Giamatti in ‘All Is Bright’: Would You Buy a Christmas Tree from These Men?

Rudd and Giamatti in 'All Is Bright': Would You Buy a Christmas Tree from These Men?

An offbeat, affecting little dark comedy, All is Bright was called Almost Christmas when it was shown at
the last Tribeca Film Festival. Luckily, nothing has changed except for the less
blatantly seasonal new title. Paul Giamatti and Paul Rudd play down-on-their-luck
Canadians who come to New York to live in a camper and sell Christmas trees for
a month, trailing a fraught personal connection.

Their emotional undercurrent accounts for the film’s darkness: Dennis
(Giamatti), a small-time thief who has just been released from prison, learns
that his former best friend and partner, Rene (Rudd), has gone straight. Worse,
Rene is engaged to Dennis’ ex-wife. Oh, and the ex-wife has told their daughter
that her father is dead. Not a typical cheery little Christmas movie, but its
mordant humor eventually becomes joyful (within reason) instead of
depressing. 

This is the second feature directed by Phil Morrison, and
while the setting is radically different from the North Carolina of his 2005
film, Junebug, the film displays a
similar close observation of distinctive characters. Rene still acts like
Dennis’s old friend, hoping that’s true despite having usurped his family. Dennis
is hurt, resentful, yet indebted to Rene for giving him work — and he is unexpectedly
practical at the Christmas-tree game.

Giamatti and Rudd make this seem effortless. Only Sally
Hawkins, so good in Blue Jasmine and
many other films, seems artificial as a Russian housekeeper who befriends
Dennis and helps him clean up (actually clean up; he needs a shower).  Everything about the character, from her
accent to her unstylish clothes, seems to exist for strained comic effect. 

Written by Melissa James Gibson, a playwright and also a
writer for the smart FX drama The
Americans, All is Bright  
is more sly
than laugh-out-loud, which suits its modest scale and ambiguous relationships.
And there are some perfect little touches. Rudd is given a brown tooth. The
score is an appealing mix of jazz-inflected Christmas carols.

It’s just as well that the film is not arriving at
Christmastime, when audiences expect sugary holiday treats. All is Bright is unsugary, a small
out-of-season miracle.

The film is now on VOD and 
opens in theaters On Oct. 4th.

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