3 Essential Tips for Writing Semi-Autobiographical Screenplays

3 Essential Tips for Writing Semi-Autobiographical Screenplays

Mark Tapio Kines is the author of Screenwriting Fundamentals, an online course on Lynda.com.
He has written and directed two features, and is the first filmmaker to
ever use crowdfunding to finance his work. Mark can be reached at his
production company’s site,

I’ve read a lot of spec screenplays over the years. Often,
after I’ve finished reading, I’ll ask the writer, “Did this story actually
happen to you?” Their eyes will light up, impressed by my apparent powers of
perception, and they will excitedly say, “Why, yes, it did!” Then I tell them that it’s usually not a good thing to hear
this question.

Here’s why: A lot of writers, whether they’re first-timers
or seasoned veterans, fall into the same traps when dramatizing their own
personal experiences. In many cases, they will wind up sacrificing a good
dramatic narrative in honor of What Really Happened, or they will treat their
protagonists – i.e. their alter egos – far too reverently.
 As a good chunk of my own first feature “Foreign Correspondents,” was semi-autobiographical, I’ve been there. Allow me to share some tips:

1. The Cardinal Rule:
Never Write a Screenplay Right After You’ve Been Dumped.
You may laugh, but I’ve read enough “break-up scripts” to
conclude that this is a problem of epidemic proportions.

We all get emotional when a relationship goes south. During
these times, it’s easy to believe that our gut-wrenching arguments and/or
imaginary conversations with our exes will make for some powerful dialogue. 

while heartbreak in the form of a 4-minute love song can have universal appeal,
when it’s stretched out into a 120-minute film it can come across as
self-indulgent, to say the least.
You might say, “But I can name lots of great break-up
movies! Annie Hall, (500) Days
of Summer, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind…”
 But those films surrounded their sad sack protagonists with cutting
humor, unusual structures, and plenty of cinematic fun-and-games. 
The break-up scripts I’m warning you about are all angst and no fun. All navel-gazing and no momentum. All passion and no story. If you’ve had your heart stepped on and you want to work out your feelings, then go ahead, write your break-up script, then stick it in a drawer. A year later, if you still think your story is solid – and not because you’re still hung up on your ex – then you can get serious about showing it to people. Otherwise, move on.
2. Find Ways to Distance Yourself from Your Protagonist.
I realize this sounds counter-intuitive. After all, as screenwriters, aren’t we supposed to identify with our characters? Well, sure. But when your protagonist is clearly a thinly-disguised version of you, you should give them a better disguise, if you catch my drift. 
Make that person more of a product of your imagination. When you have to work harder to get to know them, you will make them a more unique individual, and you’ll have a stronger story as a result. 

Try one, or more, of these shortcuts:

— Don’t
make them a writer or a filmmaker.
I know,
tell that to Fellini! But see what happens when you give your protagonist
career aspirations and day-to-day trials that are alien to your own. You might
have to do some homework, but there’s nothing wrong with that. 

them a sex change.
Whenever I’ve got a
story idea, and I realize that one of my characters is a little too obviously
me, I try to imagine what the story would be like if that character were,
instead, female. Changing your “he” to a “she,” or vice-versa, sounds like a
simple solution, but channeling your experiences through an opposite-sex
character can be quite eye-opening. If nothing else, it’ll keep you on your
toes as a writer.
them be the most interesting character in the story.
In a semi-autobiographical script, your protagonist may serve as your
de facto narrator – whether they actually narrate anything or not. You might
thus be inclined to keep them passive, there only to observe the colorful
characters and react to situations. But instead of making your protagonist the eye
of the hurricane, why not let them be the hurricane?

— Don’t
be afraid to make them a little unlikable.

As self-deprecating as screenwriters can be, I’ve found that their cinematic
stand-ins are often too flawless – or, at the very least, too blameless. This
also feeds into that “passive narrator” problem.

When I wrote Foreign
, I took a character who went through some of the
real-life experiences that I went through, and I made him do some rather rotten
things that I myself never actually did. It did a lot of good for the story,
and it turned the character into someone I could deal with more objectively.

your alter ego shouldn’t even be your protagonist. 
If your Uncle Teddy and Aunt Margie lived incredible lives, consider
what a movie about them might be like if the story didn’t have to filter all
their adventures through the eyes of their little niece or nephew (a.k.a. you).
Just because you were there in real life doesn’t mean you have to be there in
your script.

3. Never Let the
Facts Get in the Way of a Good Story.

For many writers, this is a tricky one. These days, every
time a film comes out that’s based on actual events, it’s not long before
someone criticizes said film for playing fast and loose with the facts. So when
it’s time to write your own screenplay, you might decide, “This one’s going to
be 100% accurate!”

That said, we all know that truth can be stranger than
fiction. It can also be more confusing, and certainly less structured. If you
care that much about adhering to the facts, then maybe
your film should be a documentary. But if you’re already making concessions to
drama – for instance, changing the names of the characters from their real-life
counterparts – then you should allow yourself the freedom to veer from the
naked truth, as long as it helps your story.

Like a lot of the tips in this article, this one may sound
like a no-brainer. Yet I can’t tell you the number of times a writer has said
to me, after I critiqued an implausible scene in their script, “But that’s what
really happened!” There are tricks for making such scenes appear less
contrived: a little foreshadowing, a skeptical character who stands in for the
audience, or something hopefully more elegant. But if the truth just doesn’t
serve your story well, the universe will forgive you if you bend it a little.

This Article is related to: Filmmaker Toolkit and tagged



Pay attention to the conversations when you described a obviously sad event and when you recount the event in what you believe to be a maudlin tone, your friend bursts out laughing and you are not sure what to feel. so you think that’s really not appropriate or maybe I’m missing the humor. I am thrust into a dissociative state and recall a bizarre moment last Monday I find myself at another doctor’s appointment but that’s fine, Why? Pain specialists are a patient’s best friend. The first rule for those who experience a great sense of pleasure when presented when the doctor hands you an oxycodone script. Inside you jumping for joy but you do not smile. The doctor reminds you that the prescription is stronger, In a hushed, serious tone warns you not to drink alcohol or take the muscle relaxant at the same time "You could stop breathing." My husband usually is in touch with reality bursts out laughing. I shoot an annoyed glance at him. "Why are you laughing, seriously" The doctor ignores him and repeats "Really you could stop breathing, He starts laughing, again. I want to smack him back into reality but I am holding the prescription so it doesn’t matter, "who CARES IF I STOP BREATHING. The three of us pudgy from overindulgence look half-dead anyway. If this is the way I begin, it’s a catastrophe really.

Kate Hudson

Looks totally interesting for aspiring script writers! Point 3 is for keeps indeed!

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