Columbia University Announces the Blue List Screenwriting Competition Winners

Columbia University Announces the Blue List Screenwriting Competition Winners

You’ve heard of the Black List, now here’s the Blue List. New York City’s Columbia University has announced its list of six exceptional unproduced screenplays they’ll support.

The competition was started by Columbia Film MFA students and screenwriters Tesia Walker and Emily Shesh, who modeled their idea after the Black List, which highlights exceptional unproduced screenplays in Hollywood, many of which are eventually developed into acclaimed features. Previous Black List selections include “Juno,” “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World,” and “In Bruges.”

The scripts were selected by a panel which included Glenn Close, Michael Mann, screenwriter/producer Simon Kinberg, UTA Agent Peter Benedek, WME agent Tom Wellington, screenwriter
Jim Hart, producer Dan Powell, producer Jenette Kahn, manager Dan
Halsted, manager George Heller, Preferred Content agent Abby Davis,
Preferred Content partner Ross M. Dinerstein, and NBC executive Joey
Chavez.

Walker and Shesh hope that the six screenplays (four features, two TV pilots) will bring talented Columbia writers to the attention of Hollywood. Given the amount of screenplays out there, it’s heartening to see such a prestigious school and list of industry veterans trying to give them a boost. The full list is below.

The 2014 Columbia Blue List (descriptions courtesy of the Blue List)

“The Archer” (feature) by Casey Schroen

A gay teenage girl escapes from a
sadistic troubled-teen boot camp in the middle of nowhere and must
battle the violent disciplinarians who pursue her through the
surrounding wilderness.

“Big Girls” (original pilot) by Shukree Tilghman

In order to save her job as a
legendary but aging women’s college basketball coach, Pam Ellis
reluctantly enlists Amy Washington, a troubled but highly touted recruit
from the hardscrabble, unpaved streets of southern Missouri. Through
their tumultuous relationship, they discover that winning games is not
about rescuing the program, but saving each other.


“A Death in the Andes” (feature) by Nicholas Greene

In a desperate attempt to save his
mother from illness, Carlos, a fiery salt miner from the Bolivian
highlands, seeks out his estranged uncle in the city of La Paz, where
they try to abduct Charlotte, a headstrong American doctor.

“Gifted + Talented” (original pilot) by Hannah Sanderson Buchner

In
2003, rival high school valedictorians Emma and Max were on top of the
world, their futures bright and limitless. Ten years later, however,
both have collapsed under the pressure of their promised greatness, and
must return home to seek employment at the one place willing to hire
those with almost no practical skills—the local temp agency. A comedy
about the unexpected freedom of spectacular failure.

“Gone, June” (feature) by Matthew Tyler

June, 8-months pregnant from a
sexual assault, confronts and kills her attacker, only to stumble upon
the man’s 10-year-old son as she flees the scene.  Guilt-stricken and
desperate, June takes the young boy with her on the road, and her run
from the law soon turns into a search for the boy’s mother—and her own
redemption.



“The Swimsuit Issue” (feature) by Randall Green

A high school freshman attempts to compete with the yearbook by creating the Westbury High Swimsuit Issue.

This Article is related to: Filmmaker Toolkit and tagged , , ,


Comments

Bob Drink

When was the submission deadline for the blue list? I attempt hard to get in every contest for the chance of a someday fortuitous win! Please dm me information and details, also for Ira Dutchman!

u mad

If a community college wants to organize and reach out to dozens of top-level talent and execs to serve as judges to determine a list of the best screenplays coming out of their program, as two Columbia MFA students worked tireless hours to do, they can and should. I welcome the diversity of voices.

As for the idea that Ira does anything on behalf of getting shorts into Sundance, you're giving the Columbia MFA program far too much credit.

Seriously?

Don't these spoiled entitled trust fund Columbia MFA students have enough of a "boost"? Ira Deutchman gets half of their failed opus shorts into Sundance every year. Why not find the kids in community college writing while working full time and give them a damn scholarship? Jesus H.

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