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Tarantino to Shoot ‘The Hateful Eight’ After All? (FULL CANNES VIDEO)

Tarantino to Shoot 'The Hateful Eight' After All? (FULL CANNES VIDEO)

Quentin Tarantino admitted at Cannes that he had “calmed down” over his outrage that his script for western “The Hateful Eight” had been leaked online. So he staged a live read of the 146-page first draft in Los Angeles that went well–we were there. And the filmmaker introduced Sergio Leone’s “A Fistful of Dollars” to close the Cannes Film Festival, which was also celebrating the 20th anniversary of “Pulp Fiction,” which won the Palme d’Or. It’s the prize he treasures the most, he admitted at an entertaining 50-minute press conference, below. 

In the conference Tarantino said he was working on the second draft of “The Hateful Eight” and was in no hurry to complete a third, and might shoot it, or publish it, or put it on stage, or “all three,” he said. Now Roger Friedman–who has good sources at The Weinstein Co.– reports that Tarantino is planning to shoot “The Hateful Eight” with the cast from the live read in Wyoming (where he shot “Django Unchained”) in November. 

That movie would star Samuel L. Jackson (Major Marquis Warren), Kurt Russell (bounty hunter John Ruth), Tim Roth (Brit Oswaldo Mobray), Amber Tamblyn (Daisy Domergue), Walton Goggins (Chris Mannix), Michael Madsen (John Gage), Bruce Dern (Confederate Gen. Smithers), James Parks (coach driver O.B.), Denis Menochet (Frenchman Bob), Dana Gourrier (Minnie), Zoe Bell (Six Horse Judy) and James Remar (Jody).
What about Christoph Waltz? 

In the conference (full 50-minute video below), Tarantino covers a lot of ground, from the death of digital to an idea for a four-part “Django Unchained” cable mini-series. 

Here are highlights:
Quentin Tarantino:

“Most films are not presented in 35 mm, which means that the war is lost. Digital projection is just television in public. What I knew as cinema is dead…

“Pressure should always be there, I want people to expect a lot from me, I want people waiting with great anticipation for my next movie…that kind of excitement for a filmmaker is one of the things that keeps filmmaking alive and vital. I wouldn’t want it any other way…

“I’ve never counted how many prints I have, I don’t want to put my obsession under that harsh a microscope, I have a bigger 16 mm collection, and screen them all the time. I’m always watching movies…it’s one of the nice things about my life. Because I’ve done fairly well, it has afforded me the chance to almost live an academic’s life. I’m studying for my professorship in world cinema and the day I die is the day I graduate. I learn about Dorothy Arzner, or rediscover George Roy Hill, genre cinema or country cinema. I explore it voraciously, watch them, make notes for a future book or study for my own edification. Then I put the notes away, my head is filled with new knowledge and I wait for the next kick to hit me. Now that everything has become digital, for me to screen movies in my home in my own theater, I’m watching 24 fps…

“When all of a sudden you have a release of Godard’s ‘Breathless,’ if you’re showing a new or old print of “Breathless” in the cinema that’s worth leaving the house and going to the theater to watch it. Not digital–my Criterion is fine, I don’t have to watch TV in public. When the presentation of DVDs is so good, why go see it at theaters? 35 mm: that’s a reason…

“I’m hopeful we’re going through a woozy romantic period with the death of digital. I’m hoping that while this generation is hopeless the next generation will demand the real thing. Albums are slowly coming back, I’m hopeful that future generations will be much smarter than this generation and realize what they’ve lost…

“It was people like Leone and the other Sergio, Corbucci, who really were the first true directors to specialize in not just having scores that lead and enveloped entire sequences, rather than just movie music, but opera. They cut to music, once that genie got out of the bottle it never got put back again…

“‘The Hateful Eight’ script reading was a lot of fun. I might do it on every script. I might not do it that publicly, with three days of rehearsal, explore the material… I’m working on the second draft, what I learned was immeasurable…We’ll see, I’m still writing the script. I have calmed down a bit from… the knife in the back wound is starting to scab. Exactly what I’m doing I don’t know, I’m still in the process of writing the second draft and intend to do a third draft, I’m in no hurry. Maybe I’ll shoot it, do it on stage, or publish it, or all three…

“I make my movies for me and everyone is invited to make of them what they will…

“There is 90 minutes of ‘Django Unchained’ that hasn’t been seen. My idea is to cut together a four-hour version of ‘Django Unchained,’ cut it up into hour chapters like a four-part miniseries and show it on cable television an hour at a time…Present someone a four-hour movie, they roll their eyes, then show a four-part miniseries they’re like dying to see it…

“The good side of digital is the fact that a young filmmaker can now buy a cell phone and if they have the tenacity to come up with an interesting story and actors and put something together they can actually make a move and go out on the film festival circuit. They can be legit and real. In a more democratic artistic society we’re going to put up with more junk but there will be flowers in the dustbin…

“Why an established filmmaker would shoot on digital? I don’t get it at all…

“I did an email chain with a group of friends. I asked them who they felt the 10 most exciting filmmakers were working today. I wrote my list and others wrote theirs, and we discussed it. I keep going back to the word exciting. That was an important part of delineating. It means that their best work is still in front of them, that’s what makes a new filmmaker exciting, their new movie could be their best one, that will be the new barometer by which they will be judged. It was interesting to see the different opinions of the people I respected. Only two filmmakers were on everybody’s list: David Fincher and Richard Linklater. To me the fact that Pedro Almodovar was not on everyone’s list is a mystery! He was on mine!

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