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Here Are All the Movies Opening Today, October 31. What Will You See?

Here Are All the Movies Opening Today, October 31. What Will You See?

Here are the films opening theatrically in the U.S. the week of Friday, October 31. (Synopses provided by distributor unless noted otherwise.)

READ MORE: Daniel Radcliffe on Ebola, ‘Horns’ and Being Propositioned for Sex By a Fan

The ABCs of Death 2
Director: Various
Cast: Various
Synopsis: “‘ABCs of Death 2’ is the follow-up to the most ambitious anthology film ever conceived with productions spanning from Nigeria to UK to Brazil and everywhere in between. It features segments directed by over two dozen of the world’s leading talents in contemporary genre film. The film is comprised of twenty-six individual chapters, each helmed by a different director assigned a letter of the alphabet, beginning with the letter A and ending with the letter Z. The directors were then given free rein in choosing a word to create a story involving death. Provocative, shocking, funny and at times confrontational, ‘ABCs of Death 2’ is another global celebration of next generation genre filmmaking.”
Criticwire Grade Average: C+ (4 reviews)
Theatrical Release: Various (including Austin, Denver, Houston, Kansas City, New York, Phoenix, San Antonio, Seattle and Toronto)

All You Need Is Love
Director: Stuart Cameron
Synopsis: “A documentary that focuses on the lives and dreams of the children of Good Morning School in the district of Mae Sot, Thailand. Mae Sot is one of the many towns along the Thai-Burma border where hundreds of thousands of Burmese nationals have chosen to live as a result of the repressive actions taken by Burma’s military junta. They fled from Burma and escaped to Mae Sot with the hope that they will be able to sustain their families and become free from the fear of getting shot and arrested. However, the vast majority of Burmese in the town exist as people without nationality, rights, or any solid future. This is the harsh reality that the Burmese children in Mae Sot have to face every day. The documentary highlights not just their plight, but also the positive way that these children go about their lives in conditions and under circumstances we dare not even imagine.”
Theatrical Release: Los Angeles

Before I Go To Sleep
Director: Rowan Joffe
Cast: Nicole Kidman, Colin Firth, Mark Strong, Anne-Marie Duff, Jing Lusi
Synopsis: “A woman wakes up every day, remembering nothing as a result of a traumatic accident in her past. One day, new terrifying truths emerge that force her to question everyone around her.”
Criticwire Grade Average: C- (8 reviews)
Theatrical Release: Wide

Bitter Honey
Director: Robert Lemelson
Synopsis: “‘Bitter Honey’ is a feature-length documentary presenting an intimate and emotionally charged portrait of three polygamous families in Bali, Indonesia. Following these families over a seven year period, the film portrays the plight of Balinese co-wives, for whom marriage is frequently characterized by psychological manipulation, infidelity, domestic violence, and economic hardship. Living in a society where men have authority in many domains, these women have little voice in steering or protesting the conditions of their domestic lives. Bitter Honey draws attention to their struggle, documents the work of those taking steps to better protect and empower them, and aims to trigger a wider conversation about contemporary polygamy and women’s rights in Indonesia.”
Theatrical Release: New York and Chicago (previously opened in San Francisco and Boston; opens in Portland, Salt Lake City and Washington, DC throughout November)

Blood Ransom
Director: Francis dela Torre
Cast: Anne Curtis, Alexander Dreymon, Caleb Hunt, Jamie Harris, Darion Basco
Synopsis: “When Jeremiah is caught in the middle of an ill-fated plot to kidnap Crystal, his boss Roman’s beautiful young girlfriend, Roman unleashes the psychopath, Bill, to hunt Jeremiah down. But when Crystal refuses Jeremiah’s offer to return her to Roman, Jeremiah and Crystal begin adangerous love affair on the run. And with every hour they’re together, a darker deeper secret burns within Crystal—something even more sinister than the killer who is after them.”
Theatrical Release: Various (including New York and Los Angeles, Anchorage, Chicago, Houston, Las Vegas, San Diego and Seattle)

God the Father
Director: Simon Fellows
Cast: Michael Franzese, George Georgiou
Synopsis: “God The Father…utilizes every cinematic ingredient available to tell Michael Franzese’s remarkable journey from a ‘made man’ to a man of God. From choreographed dance sequences, traditional interviews, stock footage, visceral re-enactments and sophisticated animation sequences…specifically designed to show the more violent aspects of mob life, in a subtle and intelligent way. This film is the first time the Michael Franzese story has ever been told cinematically.”
Theatrical Release: Various (including New York and Los Angeles, Anaheim and Oakland)

Goodbye to Language
Director: Jean-Luc Godard
Cast: Jessica Erickson, Héloise Godet, Zoé Bruneau, Kamel Abdeli, Richard Chevallier, Alexandre Païta, Christian Gregori, Roxy
Synopsis: “The idea is simple: A married woman and a single man meet. They love, they argue, fists fly. A dog strays between town and country. The seasons pass. The man and woman meet again. The dog finds itself between them. The other is in one, the one is in the other and they are three. The former husband shatters everything. A second film begins: the same as the first, and yet not. From the human race we pass to metaphor. This ends in barking and a baby’s cries. In the meantime, we will have seen people talking of the demise of the dollar, of truth in mathematics and of the death of a robin.” [Cannes Film Festival]
Criticwire Grade Average: B+ (23 reviews)
Theatrical Release: New York

The Great Invisible
Director: Margaret Brown
Synopsis: “On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico. It killed 11 workers and caused the worst oil spill in American history. The explosion still haunts the lives of those most intimately affected, though the story has long ago faded from the front page. At once a fascinating corporate thriller, a heartbreaking human drama and a peek inside the walls of the secretive oil industry, “The Great Invisible” is the first documentary feature to go beyond the media coverage to examine the crisis in depth through the eyes of oil executives, survivors and Gulf Coast residents who experienced it first-hand and then were left to pick up the pieces while the world moved on.” [SXSW Film Festival]
Criticwire Grade Average: B+ (8 grades)
Theatrical Release: New York and Los Angeles

The Hadza: The Last of the First
Director: Bill Benenson
Synopsis: “The Hadza, East Africa’s last remaining true hunter-gatherers and perhaps the original ‘indigenous people,’ have lived sustainably on their land near the Rift Valley birthplace of humanity for over 50,000 years. They have occupied one place probably longer than any other group on the planet, and their foraging lifestyle characterizes most of human history. Due to modern-day encroachments, the Hadza’s land and way of life are currently under attack — and a vital tie to our evolutionary roots may be lost forever.”
Theatrical Release: New York

Hit by Lightning
Director: Ricky Blitt
Cast: Jon Cryer, Will Sasso, Stephanie Szostak, Jed Rees
Synopsis: “When Ricky Miller, a single, quiet 40-year old aspiring writer and manager of Debbie’s (think Denny’s) and probably the last person you’d notice in a crowd is ‘hit by lightning’ and meets the love of his life, the beautiful Danita on E-Happily.com, he is catapulted into a relationship online but it’s a lot more than what he bargained for – this includes being asked to kill! Hounded by his best friend Seth who thinks no ’10’ would even go out with a guy like Ricky unless she had ulterior motives (or needed glasses), Ricky starts to get skeptical himself. Turns out, Danita confesses she’s actually married to a handsome affable crime novelist and former Rabbi, Ben Jacobs. Is Danita telling Ricky the truth when she says wants to leave her husband but fears for her life if she does? Will Ricky go through with the plan to kill him so he and Danita can live happily ever after?”
Theatrical Release: New York and Los Angeles, Atlanta, Detroit, Miami, Minneapolis, Orlando, Phoenix, San Francisco and Washington, DC

Horns
Director: Alexandre Aja
Cast: Daniel Radcliffe, Sabrina Carpenter, Juno Temple, Kelli Garner, James Remar, Max Minghella, Laine MacNeil, Dylan Schmid, Joe Anderson
Synopsis: “In the aftermath of his girlfriend’s mysterious death, a young man awakens to strange horns sprouting from his temples.”
Criticwire Grade Average: C+ (12 reviews)
Theatrical Release: Limited

Magical Universe
Director: Jeremy Workman
Synopsis: “Step into the unique and visionary world of lifetime outsider artist Al Carbee, an 88-year old eccentric who spends his days creating outlandish works of art featuring Barbie dolls. Filmmaker Jeremy Workman has spent over a decade with his friend Carbee, compiling extensive footage and memories to provide audiences with a window into the magical universe of Carbee’s bizarre creative force and a glimpse of an otherwise unknown artist’s lifelong body of work.” [DOC NYC]
Theatrical Release: New York (opens in Los Angeles on November 7th)

Missionary
Director: Anthony DiBlasi
Cast: Dawn Olivieri, Mitch Ryan, Kip Pardue, J. LaRose, Connor Christie, Jordan Woods-Robinson, Randy Molnar, Danielle Kimberley, Dushawn Moses
Synopsis: “A wife and mother starts an affair with a young missionary… with disastrous consequences.”
Theatrical Release: Various (including Los Angeles, Dallas, Orlando and Seattle)

Nightcrawler
Director: Dan Gilroy
Cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Bill Paxton, Rene Russo, Kevin Rahm, Riz Ahmed, Kathleen York, Ann Cusack
Synopsis: “A pulse-pounding thriller set in the nocturnal underbelly of contemporary Los Angeles. Jake Gyllenhaal stars as Lou Bloom, a driven young man desperate for work who discovers the high-speed world of L.A. crime journalism. Finding a group of freelance camera crews who film crashes, fires, murder and other mayhem, Lou muscles into the cut-throat, dangerous realm of nightcrawling — where each police siren wail equals a possible windfall and victims are converted into dollars and cents. Aided by Rene Russo as Nina, a veteran of the blood-sport that is local TV news, Lou blurs the line between observer and participant to become the star of his own story.”
Criticwire Grade Average: A- (33 reviews)
Theatrical Release: Wide

Plot for Peace
Director: Mandy Jacobson & Carlos Agulló
Cast: Jean-Yves Ollivier, Thabo Mbeki, Joachim Chissano, Denis Sassou Nguesso, Pik Botha, Winnie Mandela, Jorge Risquet, Chester Crocker, Mathews Phosa, Wynand Tu Toit
Synopsis: “In the mid-1980s, township violence raged in South Africa and one of the Cold War’s most vicious proxy conflicts devastated Angola. ‘Total onslaught’ was writ large across the horizon. It was then that a foreign commodity trader with connections to all stakeholders in the region became the lifeline for top-secret contacts. To build trust, he organized a vast prisoners’ exchange that opened the road for Mandela’s eventual release. A year later, in 1988, South Africa’s forces and 50,000 Cuban troops began withdrawing from Angola. In John LeCarré style, the land of apartheid and the front line states came out of the Cold War long before the fall of the Berlin Wall. Within fourteen months, Mandela walked out of jail – a free man and, soon, South Africa’s first democratically elected President. In ‘Plot for Peace,’ the protagonists of this high-risk venture – African heads of state, battle-tested generals, international diplomats, secret operatives, and anti-apartheid icons such as Winnie Mandela and Thabo Mbeki – recount the true story of how the front line states brought an end to apartheid and Ollivier’s remarkable hidden contributions to this historic transformation.”
Theatrical Release: New York and Washington, DC (expands to Los Angeles on November 5 and San Francisco on November 7)

Point and Shoot
Director: Marshall Curry
Synopsis: “In 2011, unassuming Matthew VanDyke left his home in Baltimore to find adventure and see the world on his motorcycle, only to end up joining the Libyan rebel army to take arms against Gaddafi. Gun in one hand, video camera in the other, Matthew finally finds purpose and meaning in his wanderlust, until he is captured and held in solitary confinement for six months and must decide where his allegiances really lie.” [Tribeca Film Festival]
Criticwire Grade Average: A- (5 reviews)
Theatrical Release: New York (expands to various cities throughout the rest of 2014)

Private Peaceful
Director: Pat O’Connor
Cast: Jack O’Connell, George MacKay, Richard Griffiths, Frances de la Tour, John Lynch
Synopsis: “The story of two devoted brothers who struggle through a harsh childhood and adolescence in rural Devon, England, before enlisting in the military for the First World War. They experience the brutal realities of the trenches and the killing fields of Flanders, and are forced to make life-altering choices in order to remain loyal to each other through the dehumanizing reality of this unprecedented war. Told from the viewpoint of Tommo Peaceful (George Mackay), a young child who looks up to his resourceful big brother Charlie (Jack O’Connell), Private Peaceful is also a powerful coming of age story about two brothers who fall in love with the same girl and must adapt to the evolving pressures of their feudal family life. When Charlie and Tommo enlist and join thousands of other unsuspecting young men in experiencing the horrors of trench warfare, they instinctively look out for each other – until a terrible incident reveals to them the heartless, brutal nature of war.”
Theatrical Release: New York and Los Angeles

Revenge of the Mekons
Director: Joe Angio
Synopsis: “Political provocateurs. Social agitators. Punk’s reigning contrarians. The Mekons have been called all this and more. Revenge of the Mekons chronicles the unlikely story of a group of radical British art students who formed in the first blast of punk rock in 1977. Against all odds—and despite a career consigned to the margins—the Mekons continue to tour and make adventurous and challenging albums, despite the fact that its eight members are separated by thousands of miles across two continents. Adored with cult-like devotion by fans and critics alike, the Mekons have redefined themselves and their music repeatedly over the years while staying true to the punk ethos. But the Mekons are more than just a band. They’re also an art collective whose members make art individually, collectively and in collaboration with other avant-garde artists.”
Theatrical Release: New York

Showrunners: The Art of Running a TV Show
Director: Des Doyle
Cast: J.J. Abrams, Joss Whedon, Terence Winter, Shawn Ryan, Damon Lindelof, Janet Tamaro, Jonathan Nolan, Ronald D. Moore, Matthew Carnahan
Synopsis: “The first ever feature-length documentary to explore the fascinating world of U.S. television showrunners and the creative forces aligned around them. These people are responsible for creating, writing, and overseeing every element of production on one of the United State’s biggest exports – television drama and comedy series.”
Theatrical Release: Los Angeles

True Son
Director: Kevin Gordon
Synopsis: “Stockton, California is considered one of the worst cities in the United States, riddled with financial crisis and crime rates rivaling Afghanistan. But where everyone else saw hopelessness, 22-year-old Michael Tubbs saw possibility. In 2012, Tubbs decided to run for City Council to reinvent his hometown, building his campaign from the ground up. In Kevin Gordon’s passionate and inspirational documentary he sets out to beat a politician twice his age and bring his community back from bankruptcy.” [Tribeca Film Festival]
Theatrical Release: New York (opens in Los Angeles on November 7th)

A World Not Ours
Director: Mahdi Fleifel
Synopsis: “‘A World Not Ours’ is an intimate, and often humorous, portrait of three generations of exile in the refugee camp of Ein el-Helweh, in southern Lebanon. Based on a wealth of personal recordings, family archives, and historical footage, the film is a sensitive, and illuminating study of belonging, friendship, and family. Filmed over more than 20 years by multiple generations of the same family, ‘A World Not Ours’ is more than just a family portrait; it is an attempt to record what is being forgotten, and mark what should not be erased from collective memory.”
Theatrical Release: Los Angeles

Missed last week? Here are all the releases from the weekend of October 24th.

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