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North Korea Washes Its Hands of Sony Cyber Assault Allegations

North Korea Washes Its Hands of Sony Cyber Assault Allegations

The Sony cyber-attack that has been unfolding over the last couple of weeks is enough to make your head spin as the studio, which suffered major personnel data leakage and a handful of internet-leaked screeners, points fingers in all directions—including, at one point, at themselves.

After a week of speculation that North Korea instigated the attack in response to Sony Pictures’ controversial comedy “The Interview,” which is set in the Communist country, NK officials, though unhappy about that film, have denounced those rumors, Variety reports.

Here’s what a North Korean diplomat told Voice of America: “Linking the DPRK (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, the official name of North Korea) to the Sony hacking is another fabrication targeting the country… My country publicly declared that it would follow international norms banning hacking and piracy.”

READ MORE: Was Sony Hacking Behind Latest Piracy Scare?

On November 24, the attacks by a group ominously self-described as “Guardians of Peace” disabled Sony’s email and internal systems. That lasted about a week, and culminated in an NSA-style disclosure of the gender inequality happening inside the studio. Over 6,000 employees’ salaries were detailed in a massive document indicating that of the 17 US Sony employees “annual rates” of $1 million and upwards, Sony Pictures co-chair Amy Pascal is the only woman. Her rate of $3 million, per the leaked spreadsheet, is highest on the list, equal to Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton.

On top of its already heightening paranoia, the global conglomerate now has to worry about losing money on films including “Still Alice,” “Mr. Turner,” “Annie” and the already-released “Fury” and more, all of which were stolen from Sony servers where videos were housed.

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