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Critics Choice Movie Awards Offer Solace to Oscar Also-Rans

Critics Choice Movie Awards Offer Solace to Oscar Also-Rans

The Critics’ Choice Movie Awards, televised Thursday night on A & E, are an entertaining amalgam of cheesy awards show and preview of things to come. With ten Best Picture nods and extra categories such as Best Action and Best Comedy, these awards voted by some 300 television, radio and online critics cover more ground than the tonier Oscars, which earlier in the day snubbed the score for “Birdman” (which wasn’t eligible), the adapted screenplay for “Gone Girl,” “Life Itself,” “The Lego Movie” and “Force Majeure.” All four won awards for their categories: Best Score, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Documentary, Animated Feature and Best Foreign Language Film. Whoops. “What a roller coaster of emotions this is today,” said “‘The Lego Movie” co-director Phil Lord. 

“Gone Girl” scribe Gillian Flynn admitted to being “disappointed” not only by her snub today, but especially by the Academy’s omission of David Fincher and the film’s editor Kirk Baxter. She says the original cut was something like 2 hours and 50 minutes, but that no “wholesale” cuts were made, just tightening. She was also comforted to know that directors like Alfred Hitchcock were never Oscar-nominated either.

Also nursing its wounds was the team behind “Selma.” Director Ava DuVernay, who did not land an Oscar nomination, sat with producer Oprah Winfrey, who did score a Best Picture Oscar nod, while snubbed actor David Oyelowo  (wearing a jacket lined with MLK quotes) cringed with embarrassment as his Nigerian father charmingly showed attendees how to pronounce Oyelowo in his native tongue. “It’s all good,” demurred DuVernay, who is beginning to realize that Common and John Legend’s song “Glory” is going to be winning the awards for “Selma.” “Thank you, Ava DuVernay for making the first feature film about Martin Luther King,” said Common, recognizing the Civil Rights Leader’s birthday. 

On the occasion of Martin Luther King’s birthday, accepting the Most Valuable Player award, Jessica Chastain, who was overlooked for a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for both “A Most Violent Year” and “Interstellar,” asked the audience to recognize the sexism, misogyny and racism around them: “I would like to encourage everyone to please speak up.” 

Read: Why ‘Selma’ Didn’t Score More Oscar Nominations

Typically, producer John Sloss, who has been deemed ineligible to accept the Best Picture Oscar should “Boyhood” win as it did tonight, was worrying about hanging on to the lead. “Boyhood” touches people emotionally, parents and kids, I told him.

In his acceptance speech Linklater reminded that he was the child of a broken home who learned when he became a parent that it was all right to carry a few wounds. He also won for Best Director. “All these little imperfections we carry around with us, that’s the essence of life itself,” he said. “Life doesn’t give you perfect, but it does give us all the opportunity to care about one another.” Patricia Arquette took home the Supporting Actress prize, thanking for their support critics and bloggers, oh yeah!  “A year ago I didn’t think anyone was going to care about this movie,” said Young Actor winner Ellar Coltrane. “Boyhood” landed four wins.

“Birdman”’s Michael Keaton took the stage thrice with equally entertaining and winning acceptance speeches for Ensemble, Comedy and Best Actor, respectively (he won the comedy Golden Globe on Sunday). Both he and life achievement honoree Kevin Costner took a humble and grateful perspective on the luck and hard work from many that helped to support their long careers. “Birdman” scored seven wins.

Golden Globe drama winner Julianne Moore practiced her acceptance speech yet again as she took home Best Actress for her Alzheimer’s sufferer in Sony PIctures Classics’ “Still Alice.” Good sport loser Jennifer Aniston hung with fiancé Justin Theroux and Reese Witherspoon in the lobby during commercials. 

As expected JK Simmons won again for “Whiplash,” whose director Damien Chazelle was one of the happier Critics Choice attendees, with five Oscar nominations for the Sony Pictures Classics film.

No-shows included Oscar nominee Bradley Cooper, who is starring on Broadway in “The Elephant Man,” and won Best Action Star for “American Sniper.” Best comedy winner Wes Anderson thanked the BFCA but couldn’t be there because he was on a train across the country, probably in Kansas right now, said his producer.
“Begin Again” best song nominee Gregg Alexander was pleasantly surprised by today’s news, and admitted to being jittery over the prospect of performing at the Oscars.

Here’s the list of winners:
BEST PICTURE

Boyhood 

BEST ACTOR

Michael Keaton — Birdman

BEST ACTRESS

Julianne Moore — Still Alice 

BEST DIRECTOR

Richard Linklater — Boyhood 

BEST COMEDY

The Grand Budapest Hotel

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY

Jenny Slate — Obvious Child

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY

Michael Keaton — Birdman

BEST SONG

Glory — Common/John Legend — Selma

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Patricia Arquette — Boyhood

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

J.K. Simmons — Whiplash 

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

The Lego Movie

 
BEST ACTION MOVIE

Guardians of the Galaxy 

BEST ACTRESS IN AN ACTION MOVIE

Emily Blunt — Edge of Tomorrow 

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS

Ellar Coltrane — Boyhood

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE

Birdman 

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Gone Girl — Gillian Flynn

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Birdman — Alejandro González Iñárritu, Nicolas Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Jr., Armando Bo 

BEST SCI-FI/HORROR MOVIE

Interstellar

BEST ACTOR IN AN ACTION MOVIE

Bradley Cooper — American Sniper 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Birdman — Emmanuel Lubezki

BEST ART DIRECTION

The Grand Budapest Hotel — Adam Stockhausen/Production Designer, Anna Pinnock/Set Decorator 

BEST EDITING

Birdman — Douglas Crise, Stephen Mirrione

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

The Grand Budapest Hotel — Milena Canonero 

BEST HAIR & MAKEUP

Guardians of the Galaxy 

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM

Force Majeure 

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

Life Itself

BEST SCORE

Antonio Sanchez — Birdman (Winner)

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