Back to IndieWire

Meet the 2015 Sundance Filmmakers #17: Alanté Kavaïté’s ‘The Summer of Sangaile’ Reflects Teenage Inspiration

Meet the 2015 Sundance Filmmakers #17: Alanté Kavaïté's 'The Summer of Sangaile' Reflects Teenage Inspiration

Alanté Kavaïté spent her childhood and adolescence in Lithuania and the other half of her life in France where she studied in the Beaux Arts School. She was always attracted to various forms of art, from sculpture to theater, from photography to video art and, “found in cinema the perfect combination.”

What it’s about:
It’s the story of Sangaile who is fascinated by stunt flying. Through the encounter with another girl, she finds in herself the strength to realize her dream.

What it’s really about:
It’s really about becoming who you are. During the teenage years, you are in a hurry to make choices while all the while being filled with doubt and fear. I wrote the story for “The Summer of Sangaile” with the guiding idea that sometimes it only takes a chance encounter with someone who helps you see yourself in a different light to overcome certain difficulties. I wanted this kind and caring individual to be another young girl of the same age, but whose personality was diametrically opposed to Sangaile’s in order to bring out her flaws and contradictions. From the writing stage I had envisioned a film that would be bright and light, even if the movie addresses adolescent unrest and self-destructive behavior, for with hindsight, obstacles that seemed insurmountable at the time are now put in their proper perspective. Yet, the joys of adolescence remain intense. Moments of fear and suffering appear to us today as necessary steps to find balance in our lives, emancipate ourselves and grow up. 

Biggest challenge:
My main concern was finding the perfect actresses, but we were lucky and found Julija and Aisté very quickly. However, my biggest challenge was shooting spectacular stunt planes under a short schedule and budget constraints.

Any films inspire you?
The work of Gus Van Sant inspires me a lot. But also Japanese cinema of the ’60s-’70s like Yasuzo Masumura for example.

Cameras used:
80% was shot with the Sony F55 4K raw. Then we also used some Sony RX100 MK2, CX 740 and AS15, some RED Epic 5K, Canon 7D and D800, Panasonic HPX250 P2 and a GH2 for the octocopter.

Did you crowdfund?
We did not crowdfund the film, we did not have the time to setup for that.

Hopes for Sundance audience take-away:
Some precious and fragile teenage beauty, some positive emotions through this sensorial journey. The need to believe in yourself and fulfill your dreams.

What’s next?
I’m currently working on two very exciting projects, but it’s too early to talk about them. All I can say is that one will be shot in France and the other somewhere around the Baltic sea.

Indiewire invited Sundance Film Festival directors to tell us about their films, including what inspired them, the challenges they faced and what they’re doing next. We’ll be publishing their responses leading up to the 2014 festival. For profiles go HERE. Indiewire invited Sundance Film Festival directors to tell us about their films, including what inspired them, the challenges they faced and what they’re doing next. We’ll be publishing their responses leading up to the 2015 festival. For profiles go 
HERE.

This Article is related to: Festivals and tagged ,