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Sundance: Jack Black and James Marsden Saved Their ‘D Train’ Sex Scene for Last

Sundance: Jack Black and James Marsden Saved Their 'D Train' Sex Scene for Last

Sundance kicked things off to a raunchy start on opening night with the world premiere of “The Bronze,” which (as we reported) features a sex scene for the ages between two gymnasts. The good times continued on the second night of the festival when Jack Black’s new vehicle, “The D Train,” was unveiled at the Library Theater.

The sex depicted in “The D Train” is nowhere near as explicit as that shown in the opening night film, but it’s still sure to draw headlines simply because of who’s involved: Black and his male co-star in the comedy, James Marsden.

In “The D Train,” directed by first-time feature filmmakers and comedy writers Andrew Mogel and Jarrad Paul, Black plays Dan Landsman, a painfully ordinary, deeply insecure family man with a boring job who is deep in the throes of helping plan his impending high school reunion. After coming across a Banana Boat TV commercial starring his former hunky classmate Oliver Lawless (Marsden), Dan decides to fly to Los Angeles to track him down and get him to come to the reunion. Once in Los Angeles, Dan discovers that Oliver is bisexual and after a few tequila shots too many, they find themselves back at Oliver’s apartment where the deed goes down. It starts out with a passionate kiss and if you blink, you’ll miss it — the shot of Marsden pounding Black. 

Naturally the scene dominated the post-screening discussion.

“We saved it for the last day of shooting,” Marsden said. “The last week, Jack and I realized it wasn’t such a great idea, ’cause it sounded like we were saving it for celebration — to wrap the movie with that scene.” 

The sequence was shot in eight to ten takes according to the filmmakers and a lot of tequila was involved (eight shots to be exact) to calm the actors’ nerves. 

Mogel revealed that the scene was initially supposed to run longer with “several angles” at play. “But we ultimately decided it was best as a quick pop. We always kind of thought that less was more.” 

READ MORE: The 2015 Indiewire Sundance Bible

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