Back to IndieWire

‘Pause of the Clock’ is a Film 20 Years in the Making

'Pause of the Clock' is a Film 20 Years in the Making

Here’s your daily dose of an indie project in progress — at the end of the week, you’ll have the chance to vote for your favorite.

In the meantime: Is this a project you’d want to see? Tell us in the comments

Pause of the Clock

Tweetable Logline: 1995 meets 2015 in “Pause of the Clock”: a living time capsule shot in 16mm and ready to be unpaused.

Elevator Pitch: In January 1995, using 16mm film equipment, we started shooting “Pause of the Clock” in Colorado and Chicago. Finally, in May 1996 we shot the final scene. Then, basically, the film sat in my closet for the next 18 years. Paused. Until now. “Pause of the Clock” is a film about friendship, secrets and the power of stories. Rob gathers together a group of friends to make a film called “Crueler Than Truth.” Among them is his roommate Dylan, who discovers his diary. The Rob within its pages is a much different person than the friend Dylan thought he knew.

Production Team: 

Rob Christopher (writer/director/producer/actor) graduated from Columbia College in 1997. He co-edited Tchavdar Georgiev’s “Kosher Messiah,” a personal documentary about anti-Semitism in the former Soviet Union. He served as a features/documentaries programmer for the 29th Reeling Film Festival. He has written about film, cocktails, and sundry other Chicago topics for the website Chicagoist since 2006. Author of the books “100 Spinning Plates” and “Queue Tips: Discovering Your Next Great Movie,” he has also written articles for such publications as the “Chicago Reader” and “American Libraries,” and wrote the introduction to the young adult edition of “Sad Stories of the Death of Kings,” by Barry Gifford. An active contributor to CINE-FILE, an independent cineaste web resource, he is currently working on a project titled 3 Things about 1000 Movies. He lives in Chicago.

Tchavdar Georgiev
(cinematographer/actor) graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1997, and later received an MFA from the USC School of Cinematic Arts. An Emmy-nominated producer, director, and editor, he has crafted award-winning films, commercials, and television both in the US and abroad. His many projects include “The Desert of Forbidden Art” (co-written, produced, and edited with Amanda Pope), which won multiple film festival awards and premiered on PBS’ Independent Lens; “Nevsky Prospect,” a feature-length thriller which he produced for Amazon Studios, a division of amazon.com; and “Finders Keepers” (editor), which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2015. He lives in Los Angeles.

Dylan Lorenz
(sound recordist/boom operator/actor) graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1997. His film “120 over 60,” which he wrote and directed, was a Student Academy Awards finalist. He has worked as a video editor and multimedia producer in New York since 2002. He lives in Brooklyn, and is currently pursuing an MA in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation at NYU.

Matt Trifilo
(sound designer) has contributed sound design and post-production audio to numerous projects, including commercials for Intel, Wrangler, Nike, Hammer Bowling, TableCraft, FLOW Snowboarding, and films such as “Where the Buffalo Roam” and “Oconomowoc.”

About the Film: 
Though I started making it in 1995, I believe that “Pause of the Clock” is not simply a souvenir—it’s a message from the past about how our society has changed in 20 years, while also exploring those things about us and our relationships that technology can’t touch. A living time capsule. The struggle to communicate and connect is one of the themes at the heart of the film, and the relative absence of technology onscreen clarifies things. There are no computers in “Pause of the Clock,” no social media and no cell phones.

Current Status:
Post-production

If you have an in-the-works project and you’d like to be profiled in an upcoming IW Project of the Day column, submit yourself by filling out this form!

This Article is related to: Filmmaker Toolkit and tagged