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‘The Imitation Game’ Wins Best Adapted Screenplay USC Libraries Scripter Award

'The Imitation Game' Wins Best Adapted Screenplay USC Libraries Scripter Award

First-time screenwriter Graham Moore, 33, adapted author Andrew Hodges’ 1983 biography of mathematician and Enigma code-breaker Alan Turing, “Alan Turing: The Enigma.” He had long wanted to write a screenplay about Turing, but finally found out at a party that first-time producer Nora Grossman had picked up the rights to Hodges’ book. Moore promptly pitched her his take and stuck with the project, working with producers Grossman and Ida Ostrowsky and eventual director Morten Tyldum. 
USC Libraries Scripter Award selection committee chair Howard Rodman announced the winners at the black-tie event on Saturday, Jan. 31, at USC’s historic Doheny Memorial Library. “Alan Turing never got to stand on a stage and hear people applaud his name,” Moore said as he accepted the award. “And I do right now, and that is a profound injustice. All that I can do is spend the rest of my life endeavoring to repair it.”
Rodman, a USC screenwriting professor and vice president of the Writers Guild of America, West said the Scripter selection committee (of which I am a member) chose “The Imitation Game” from a field of 97 eligible films. Rodman also presented Southern California mystery writer Walter Mosley with the Literary Achievement Award.  Mosley is currently working on a Broadway version of his first Easy Rawlins novel, “Devil in a Blue Dress,” which was adapted in 1995 into a film starring Denzel Washington. 

“In one stroke, Walter stood the crime genre on its head,” Rodman said. “And in doing so, over the course of a 25-year career, has triumphantly turned the world 180 degrees.” Accepting the award, Mosely said:  “By making libraries stronger we make America stronger.”

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