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Exclusive: Minor Threat Break Up In Clip From Doc ‘Salad Days: A Decade Of Punk In Washington, DC (1980-90)’

Exclusive: Minor Threat Break Up In Clip From Doc 'Salad Days: A Decade Of Punk In Washington, DC (1980-90)'

The group only existed for three years and released 26 songs, but the ’80’s hardcore band Minor Threat are a seminal staple to anyone with a passing interest in the genre. Ian Mackaye and company arrived in the midst of a thriving scene that emerged in Washington, DC in the early part of that decade, one that birthed many influential bands and laid down a DIY ethos that would inspire countless others across the country and around the globe in the succeeding decades. It’s a fascinating story told in Scott Crawford‘s documentary “Salad Days: A Decade Of Punk In Washington, DC (1980-90),” and today we have an exclusive clip from the film.

READ MORE: SXSW ’12 Review: ‘Bad Brains: A Band In DC,’ A Kinetic, Frenetic & Long Overdue Tribute To the Legendary Hardcore Band  

Featuring insights from Mackaye, Henry Rollins, Thurston Moore, Brian Baker, Dave Grohl, and many more, ‘Salad Days’ dives deep into the era, detailing the peaks and valleys of the hardcore punk milieu across ten years, the bands and musicians who made an impact and some that were overlooked, and the scene’s legacy. But as this sequence from the film shows, the DC hardcore scene wasn’t always idealistic, as members of Minor Threat detail their last show and why they broke up.

“Salad Days: A Decade Of Punk In Washington, DC (1980-90)” is on Vimeo today (click here to order) and hits DVD on September 18th. It’s an inspiring look at great era in punk rock, so be sure to track it down. Watch below.

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