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Criterion Collection to Add ‘Speedy,’ ‘Downhill Racer,’ ‘Jellyfish Eyes’ and More This December

Criterion Collection to Add 'Speedy,' 'Downhill Racer,' 'Jellyfish Eyes' and More This December

READ MORE: What We Learned from Watching (Almost) the Entire Criterion Collection

Four new films will be added to the Criterion Collection this December, including both classics and movies released as early as this summer. Each film will be released on both Blu-ray and DVD and will come with plenty of extras, such as interviews with the likes of Robert Redford, Jim Jarmusch and Takashi Murakami.

Check out all of the new additions below. Synopses are courtesy of Criterion Collection.

“Downhill Racer” (1969)
Astonishing Alpine location photography and a young Robert Redford in one of his earliest starring roles are just two of the visual splendors of “Downhill Racer,” the visceral debut feature by Michael Ritchie. In a beautifully understated performance, Redford is David Chappellet, a ruthlessly ambitious skier competing for Olympic gold with an underdog American team in Europe, and Gene Hackman provides tough support as the coach who tries to temper the upstart’s narcissistic drive for glory. With a subtle screenplay by the acclaimed novelist James Salter, “Downhill Racer” is a vivid character portrait, buoyed by breathtakingly fast and furious imagery that places the viewer directly in the mind of the competitor.

Jellyfish Eyes” (2013)
Takashi Murakami, one of the most popular artists in the world, made his directorial debut with “Jellyfish Eyes,” taking his boundless imagination to the screen in a tale that is about friendship and loyalty at the same time as it addresses humanity’s penchant for destruction. After moving to a country town with his mother following his father’s death, a young boy befriends a charming, flying, jellyfish-like sprite—only to discover that his schoolmates have similar friends, and that neither they nor the town itself are what they seem to be. Pointedly set in a post-Fukushima world, Murakami’s modest-budgeted special effects extravaganza boasts unforgettable creature designs and carries a message of cooperation and hope for all ages.

This release will include a new interview with director Takashi Murakami as well as two never-before-seen behind-the-scenes documentaries.

“Speedy” (1928)
Speedy was the last silent feature to star Harold Lloyd—and one of his very best. The slapstick legend reprises his Glasses Character, this time as a good-natured but scatterbrained New Yorker who can’t keep a job. He finally finds his true calling when he becomes determined to help save the city’s last horse-drawn trolley, which is operated by his sweetheart’s crusty grandfather. From its joyous visit to Coney Island to its incredible Babe Ruth cameo to its hair-raising climactic stunts on the city’s streets, Speedy is an out-of-control love letter to New York that will have you grinning from ear to ear.

This release will include a new documentary, “In the Footsteps of ‘Speedy,” and a collection of Harold Lloyd’s own home videos, narrated by his daughter, Suzanne Lloyd.

“Burroughs: The Movie” (1983)
Made up of intimate, revelatory footage of the singular author and poet filmed over the course of five years, Howard Brookner’s 1983 documentary about William S. Burroughs was for decades mainly the stuff of legend; that changed when Aaron Brookner, the late director’s nephew, discovered a print of it in 2011 and spearheaded a restoration. Now viewers can enjoy the invigorating candidness of “Burroughs: The Movie,” a one-of-a-kind nonfiction portrait that was brought to life with the help of a remarkable crew of friends, including Jim Jarmusch and Tom DiCillo, and that features on-screen appearances by fellow artists of Burroughs’s including Allen Ginsberg, Herbert Huncke, Patti Smith, and Terry Southern.

This release will include new interviews with filmmakers Jim Jarmusch, Aaron Brookner and Tom DiCillo, as well as footage from the 2014 New York Film Festival premiere of its restored version.

READ MORE: 10 Films That Should Be in the Criterion Collection

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