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Watch: Here’s How to Create Killer Transitions

Watch: Here's How to Create Killer Transitions

Vimeo has recently partnered Story & Heart, co-founded by former Stillmotion partners, to bring all-new educational posts and videos to Vimeo Video School free to all Vimeo members. With their permission, we’re sharing a recent post and video (above) with our readers.

READ MORE: Exclusive Video: Mary Harron on How to Get Your Film Made Regardless of Budget

The easiest transitions are made by connecting shots and sequences that are similar to each other (think alternate angles of the same subject and sequential events). It’s more challenging to connect shots that are dissimilar or filmed at a different time. But accomplishing these complex transitions can add another experience for your viewer and take your story to another level.

Matty BrownVimeo Staff Pick All Star (with 15 Staff Picks!) and Story & Heart filmmaker, is a master of these killer transitions. We spent time with him to learn how he pulls off such seamless transitions in “Playground, Italy,” a short that navigates transitions in mind-bendingly smooth ways.

Here’s what we gleaned from Matty’s expertise:

– Put shots and sequences that have similar lighting or motion next to each other. This will help with continuity, and when cutting together the different takes, it will make the story appear seamless.

– Keep moving shots around and audition them with a variety of options. The more you switch them around, the more you start to narrow down the ones that work well with each other — and you’ll find that golden pair that works perfectly.

– Don’t forget to use sound (or to add sound) to tie scenes together. You may have “ugly” footage, but with the right music and sound design, your project can transform into something that tugs at viewers’ hearts.

To venture deeper into Matty’s process, head to the Academy of Storytellers for the full “Inside Matty Brown’s Mind” tutorial series.

READ MORE: This is How You Do It: 10 Filmmaking Tips from Mark and Jay Duplass

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