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What Did the London Film Festival Get?

What Did the London Film Festival Get?

The 59th annual BFI London Film Festival (October 7 through 8) has scooped plenty of top-tier titles off the festival circuit, landing European premieres of opening nighter “Suffragette” and closing selection “Steve Jobs.” Both should pop up in Telluride this weekend.

All in all, the festival will screen a total of 238 fiction and documentary features, including 16 World Premieres, 8 International Premieres, 40 European Premieres and 11 Archive films including 5 Restoration World Premieres.

This year’s galas include Cannes winner “Carol,” along with a talk with director Todd Haynes, plus Venice world-premiere “Black Mass,” “Trumbo,” “Brooklyn,” and European productions “The Lady in the Van” and TIFF premiere “High-Rise.” Strand galas include “A Bigger Splash” (also in Venice), “The Program,” Cannes winner “The Lobster,” acclaimed SXSW doc “Brand: A Second Coming” and “The Assassin.”

READ MORE: Fall Fest Contenders: What’s Coming, What’s Not

Special presentations include “The Forbidden Room,” Fox Searchlight Oscar doc hopeful “He Named Me Malala,” as well as “Truth.”

In the official competitions for narrative and first feature are London premieres of “11 Minutes,” “Beasts of No Nation,” “Cemetery of Splendour,” “Son of Saul” and “Room,” plus Sundance premieres “Tangerine” and “The Witch,” and SXSW turned Cannes Critics’ Week fave “Krisha.” The documentary competition slate includes “In Jackson Heights,” the latest from director Frederick Wiseman.

The rest of the lineup breaks off into strands of films we’ve seen on the circuit, or in stateside release, or will see in Venice, Telluride and Toronto. We lay out the competition entries below, and the full slate lives here.

READ MORE: Christopher Nolan to Address Film Preservation at London Film Fest

OFFICIAL COMPETITION

Jerzy Skolimowski, 11 MINUTES
Cary Fukunaga, BEASTS OF NO NATION
Apichatpong Weerasethakul, CEMETERY OF SPLENDOUR
Athina Rachel Tsangari, CHEVALIER
Simon Stone, THE DAUGHTER
Jonás Cuarón, DESIERTO (European Premiere)
Lucile Hadžihalilović, EVOLUTION
Johnnie To, OFFICE (European Premiere)
Lenny Abrahamson, ROOM
László Nemes, SON OF SAUL
Terence Davies, SUNSET SONG
Sean Baker, TANGERINE
Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya, VERY BIG SHOT (European Premiere)

FIRST FEATURE COMPETITION

Mai Masri, 3000 NIGHTS (European Premiere)
Eva Husson, BANG GANG (A MODERN LOVE STORY)
Magnus von Horn, THE HERE AFTER
Trey Edward Shults, KRISHA
Yared Zeleke, LAMB
Esther May Campbell, LIGHT YEARS
Ariel Kleiman, PARTISAN
Eugenio Canevari, PAULA
Bentley Dean, Martin Butler, TANNA
Piero Messina, THE WAIT
Nitzan Gilady, WEDDING DOLL (European Premiere)
Robert Eggers, THE WITCH

DOCUMENTARY COMPETITION

João Pedro Plácido, (BE)LONGING
Mor Loushy, CENSORED VOICES
David Sington, THE FEAR OF 13 (World Premiere)
Alexandria Bombach, Mo Scarpelli, FRAME BY FRAME (European Premiere)
Alexander Sokurov, FRANCOFONIA
Frederick Wiseman, IN JACKSON HEIGHTS
Walter Salles, JIA ZHANGKE, A GUY FROM FENYANG
Tomer Heymann, MR. GAGA (International Premiere)
Patricio Guzmán, THE PEARL BUTTON
Sarah Turner, PUBLIC HOUSE (World Premiere)
Jennifer Peedom, SHERPA (European Premiere)
Hanna Polak, SOMETHING BETTER TO COME

SHORT FILM AWARD

João Paulo Miranda Maria, COMMAND ACTION
Till Nowak, DISSONANCE
Nina Gantz, EDMOND
Peter Tscherkassky, THE EXQUISITE CORPUS
Mees Peijnenburg, A HOLE IN MY HEART
An van Dienderen, LILI (International Premiere)
Maïmouna Doucouré, MOTHER(S)
Shai Heredia, Shumona Goel, AN OLD DOG’S DIARY (European Premiere)
Caroline Bartleet, OPERATOR (World Premiere)
Jörn Threlfall, OVER
Vivienne Dick, RED MOON RISING (World Premiere)
Ziya Demirel, TUESDAY

FILM GUESTS

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