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New York Film Critics Circle Adds Six, Including Richard Brody and Alison Willmore

New York Film Critics Circle Adds Six, Including Richard Brody and Alison Willmore

The New York Film Critics Circle has announced the addition of six new members, including the New Yorker’s Richard Brody, BuzzFeed’s Alison Willmore, L Magazine’s Nicolas Rapold, The Guardian’s Jordan Hoffman, Slant’s Ed Gonzales and the New York Post’s Sara Stewart.

Of particular note, given that Meryl Streep has recently drawn attention to the gender imbalance in film criticism generally and “the New York Film Critics” in specific, is that two of the new inductees are women. With eight out of 37 members — up from six out of 31 — it’s hardly an even split, but 22 percent is at least slightly closer than 19.

All 37 members of the NYFCC will vote on their year-end awards on December 2, with the annual gala to follow on January 4. 

Here’s the complete press release:

The New York Film Critics Circle announced today
that six new members will join the group.  Additions include Sara
Stewart, NY Post; Alison Willmore, Buzzfeed.com; Nicolas Rapold, The L
Magazine; Jordan Hoffman, The Guardian; Ed Gonzalez, Slant.com; Richard
Brody, The New Yorker. The NYFCC will vote for the 2016
awards on December 2 and hold their annual Gala Awards dinner in January 4 at Tao Downtown.

 


“What keeps the NYFCC vital is the regular infusion of new blood and
strong opinions. The new members are some of the best film critics
working, and represent a cross-section of old and new media, as well as a
blend of generations,” states chair Marshall Fine.


 


Founded in 1935, the New York Film Critics Circle is the oldest and most
prestigious in the country. The circle’s membership includes critics
from daily and weekly newspapers, magazines and the web’s most respected
online publications. Every year the organization meets in New York to
vote on awards for the calendar year’s films.


 


The Circle’s awards are often seen as shaping the Oscar race. The
Circle’s awards are also viewed — perhaps more accurately — as a
principled alternative to the Oscars, honoring aesthetic merit in a
forum that is immune to commercial and political pressures.

  

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