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Watch: 3-Minute Supercut Details The Film References In Quentin Tarantino’s ‘The Hateful Eight’

Watch: 3-Minute Supercut Details The Film References In Quentin Tarantino’s ‘The Hateful Eight’

1970s grindhouse, exploitation, spaghetti westerns, martial arts films from Hong Kong, Japanese Chambara films –– Quentin Tarantino adapts from them all and then some, with his films containing homages and oftentimes shot-for-shot examples of his massive knowledge of cinema.

READ MORE: Ranked: Quentin Tarantino’s 50 Best Characters

In his most recent film “The Hateful Eight,” he adopts the idea from John Sturges’s “The Magnificent Seven,” (which was taken from Kurosawa’s “Seven Samurai”) and shacks up a mischievous, ragtag team of outlaws, curmudgeons, and misfits in a haberdashery amidst a snowstorm. Tarantino’s nods to the films of yesteryear are in full effect, though this time, he’s remained more in the past several decades than usual.

Ollie Paxton created a mashup of QT’s references, including “The Magnificent Seven” and others. Notably, Tarantino gives several nods to his own films, particularly the introduction and dissolution of Tim Roth’s character mirroring that of Mr. Orange, his bleeding heart cop in “Reservoir Dogs.”

A shot of Samuel L. Jackson in a chair recalls him sitting in a similar position in the director’s “Django Unchained,” and frequent collaborator Michael Madsen makes reference to 2009’s “Inglorious Basterds” when he declares that, “a bastard’s work is never done.”

Tarantino references other films aside from his own –– specifically John Carpenter’s “The Thing,” also featuring ‘Eight’ star Kurt Russell –– borrowing shots from a plethora of pictures. Can you think of any references that are missing? Let us know in the comments below.

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