You will be redirected back to your article in seconds
Back to IndieWire

Louis C.K. Accused of Sexual Misconduct by Five Women, Reportedly Asked to Masturbate in Front of Them

Five women have come forward with allegations against the popular stand-up comedian.

Louis C.K.

Louis C.K.

Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock

Louis C.K. has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women in a new report published by The New York Times. The women include Chicago comedy duo Dana Min Goodman and Julia Wolov, Abby Schachner, Rebecca Corry, and an anonymous woman. Goodman and Julia Wolov told The Times they met C.K. during a performance at the U.S. Comedy Arts Festival in Aspen, during which C.K. invited them to hang out at his hotel room. It was here where the women say C.K. asked if he could take out his penis.

“He proceeded to take all of his clothes off, and get completely naked, and started masturbating,” Goodman said.

Corry was working as a producer on a 2005 television pilot in which C.K was appearing as a guest star. She says the comedian approached her and asked if he could masturbate in front of her.

“He leaned close to my face and said, ‘Can I ask you something?’ I said, ‘Yes,’” Corry said in a written statement to The Times. “He asked if we could go to my dressing room so he could masturbate in front of me.” After she declined, she says C.K’s “face got red” and he told her he “had issues.”

Courteney Cox and David Arquette were executive producers on the television pilot and word got to them about Corry’s encounter with C.K. Cox and Arquette both confirmed they heard about what happened to The Times. “What happened to Rebecca on that set was awful,” Cox said in an email.

Schachner says she called C.K. in 2003 to invite him to one of her shows, and she told The Times she could hear him masturbating as they spoke over the phone. She says the conversation between them became “unprofessional and inappropriate” and that he allegedly started telling her sexual fantasies and masturbating. “I definitely wasn’t encouraging it,” she said. “You want to believe it’s not happening.” Schachner’s friend, Stuart Harris, confirmed he was told the story in 2003.

A fifth woman, who is remaining anonymous, told The Times that she was working on “The Chris Rock Show” when C.K. repeatedly asked her to watch him masturbate. C.K. was a writer and producer on the sketch comedy series. The anonymous woman was only in her 20s at the time of the alleged misconduct. C.K. declined to comment on any of the allegations made in The Times article.

Rumors involving Louis C.K’s sexual misconduct have been percolating for some time. In 2015, comedian Jen Kirkman told a story on her podcast about an unnamed successful comedian whom she called a “known perv.” The subject was widely believed to be C.K. Earlier this year, Tig Notaro made headlines by bringing up C.K.’s history of harassment, telling The Daily Beast that the comedian should “handle” the rumors against him.

“I think it’s important to take care of that, to handle that, because it’s serious to be assaulted,” Notaro said. “It’s serious to be harassed. It’s serious, it’s serious, it’s serious.”

Speaking to The Village Voice in September, Kirkman said, “There are rumors out there that Louis takes his dick out at women,” a claim Roseanne Barr first shared in an interview with The Daily Beast in June 2016. “It’s Louis C.K., locking the door and masturbating in front of women comics and writers. I can’t tell you—I’ve heard so many stories,” she said. “Not just him, but a lot of them. And it’s just par for the course. It’s just shit women have to put up with.”

C.K., who is one of the creators of Pamela Adlon’s FX series “Better Things,” is the director and star of the new film, “I Love You, Daddy,” which he also directed. The movie premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in September and was instantly met with controversy over its plot, which involves a 17-year-old (Chloë Grace Moretz) falling for a 68-year-old (John Malkovich). A scene in the movie involves a character pretending to masturbate at length in front of people. Indie film distributor The Orchard canceled the premiere of the film hours before The New York Times published its article.

This Article is related to: Television and tagged ,