‘Doctor Who’ Showrunner on Why He Never Cast a Woman: ‘We Have to Keep Everyone on Board’

Departing “Doctor Who” showrunner Steven Moffat, who has helmed the beloved BBC series since 2009, recently defended his decision not to cast a woman as the Doctor despite overwhelming fan support. “This isn’t a show exclusively for progressive liberals; this is also for people who voted Brexit,” said Moffat, according to UK outlet The Telegraph. “That’s not me politically at all – but we have to keep everyone on board.”

Moffat also said he considered the idea of casting a woman at one point, but became “obsessed” with the idea of putting Peter Capaldi in the role. “We could have replaced Matt Smith with a woman, given that his Doctor was more sexless and less of a lad, but then I got obsessed with seeing Peter in the TARDIS.”

The Scottish writer and producer, also executive producer of “Sherlock,” is handing over the series to Chris Chibnall, who has written for “Broadchurch” and “Torchwood.” Chibnall is responsible for casting “Broadchurch” star Jodie Whittaker as the first woman Doctor, a decision that has received near-universal approval from the series’ rabid fandom.

Although Moffat put his foot in his mouth this time, he has been very supportive of Whittaker’s casting in the past.