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Lola Kirke Claps Back to ‘Gemini’ Review in The New Yorker: ‘Maybe a Push Up Bra’ Would Help?

The actress takes issue with Anthony Lane's take on the mystery/thriller.

gemini

Lola Kirke in “Gemini”

Lola Kirke is unhappy with Anthony Lane’s review of “Gemini” for the New Yorker, but it isn’t because he didn’t like her performance in the mystery/thriller directed by Aaron Katz. Rather, it’s due to a passage in which Lane comments on the appearance of Kirke’s character, calling it “hardly flattering.”

“Dear Anthony Lane, my costume was no oversight, it was intentional — however the desired effect was not to make me appear unsightly — rather, it was show you that a woman is powerful and beautiful in the big jeans and baggy gray tops you so abhor,” Kirke writes on Instagram.

The offending excerpt refers to Kirke’s character’s “big jeans,” “baggy gray top,” and “the haircut from hell — brown bangs cut straight across, as if by a six-year-old with blunt scissors.” (Lane seems to be a fan of Kirke herself, writing that the actress “requires no disguise; she is sphinxlike enough as it is.”)

“I have learned to take the opinions of others — particularly those belonging to the media — with a few thousand grains of salt,” Kirke goes on. “Still I can’t help but feel disappointed when a publication like @newyorkermag allows such glib commentary about women’s appearances to be published. In this heated moment of vibrant discussion surrounding women’s bodies, liberal journalism needs to be adding an entirely different voice to this conversation.”

Read Kirke’s full response below.

I wonder what Anthony Lane would have considered a more “flattering” get up for a female character. Perhaps tighter jeans so my ass would get some more screen time? Maybe a push up bra paired with a low cut blouse would have secured my place in the canon of heroines who succeed against all odds without letting you forget both their youth and fertility? As for the hair, it seems the cut exceeds the designated dose of quirk we accept from women on screen. Dear Anthony Lane, my costume was no oversight, it was intentional—however the desired effect was not to make me appear unsightly—rather, it was to show you that a woman is powerful and beautiful in the big jeans and baggy gray tops you so abhor. Media is king—and the ideals put forth by an emblem of intellectual culture like #thenewyorker—are going to be internalized to some degree by the people who read them. It will be of great detriment to our society to have a class of forward thinking human beings reifying outdated standards of beauty. I have learned to take the opinions of others—particularly those belonging to the media—with a few thousand grains of salt. Still I can’t help but feel disappointed when a publication like @newyorkermag allows such glib commentary about women’s appearances to be published. In this heated moment of vibrant discussion surrounding women’s bodies, liberal journalism needs to be adding an entirely different voice to this conversation.

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