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Cannes 2018: Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ to Close Festival, Michael B. Jordan’s ‘Fahrenheit 451’ Sets Premiere

20 years after starting to develop "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote," Gilliam will finally unveil his passion project at Cannes next month.

“Don Quixote” and “Fahrenheit 451”

Screenshot/HBO

Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is confirmed to world premiere at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, nearly two decades after after the director first started developing the passion project. The fantasy movie, starring Jonathan Pryce and Adam Driver, will close the festival on May 19 after the awards ceremony. “Don Quixote” is being released theatrically in France the same day.

“Don Quixote” stars Pryce as a delusional older man who is convinced he is the real Don Quixote. After he confuses an advertising executive named Toby (Driver) for his squire, Sancho Panza, the two men set out on a journey that seduces Toby into Don Quixote’s illusionary world.

Gilliam first started work on “Don Quixote” back in 1998. The film was considered a question mark for Cannes as it was still facing a potential legal battle earlier this month. Producer Paulo Branco, who was attached to the film years ago before cutting ties with Gilliam, claimed he still owned rights to the movie and that Gilliam couldn’t premiere it without his permission.

In addition to “Don Quixote,” Cannes will also world premiere HBO’s “Fahrenheit 451.” The Ray Bradbury adaptation comes from “Man Push Cart” and “99 Homes” writer-director Ramin Bahrani and stars Michael B. Jordan and Michael Shannon. The movie will premiere in the Midnight section. HBO has premiered original films at Cannes in the past, including Steven Soderbergh’s “Behind the Candelabra.” Other Cannes 2018 additions are listed below.

Competition
“Knife + Heart,” Yann Gonzalez
“Akya,” Sergey Dvortsevoy
“The Wild Pear,” Nuri Bilge Ceylan

Out of Competition
“The House That Jack Built,” Lars von Trier

Un Certain Regard
“Meurs, monstre, meurs,” Alejandro Fadel
“The Dead and the Others,” João Salaviza and Renée Nader Messora
“Donbass,” Sergey Loznitsa

Midnight
“Whitney,” Kevin Macdonald

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