The Rabbi’s Cat

Based on the best-selling graphic novel by Joann Sfar, The Rabbi’s Cat tells the story of a rabbi and his talking cat, a sharp-tongued feline philosopher brimming with scathing humor and a less than pure love for the rabbi’s teenage daughter. Algeria in the 1920s is an intersection of Jewish, Arab and French culture. A cat belonging to a widowed rabbi and his beautiful daughter, Zlabya, eats the family parrot and miraculously gains the ability to speak. With the power of speech comes unparalleled sardonic wit as the cat question’s faith, tradition and authority in a provocative exploration of God, lust, death, phrenology, religious intolerance, love, and the search for truth. Rich with the colors, textures, flavors and music of Mediterranean Africa, the film embarks on a cross continent adventure from the tiled terraces, fountains, quays and cafes of colonial Algiers to Maghrebi tent camps, dusty trading outposts, and deep blue Saharan nights in search of a lost Ethiopian city.

Reality (2015)

Jason (Alain Chabat), a quiet cameraman, dreams of directing his first horror movie. Bob Marshal (Jonathan Lambert), a wealthy producer, accepts to finance his movie on one condition: Jason has 48 hours to find the perfect scream in the history of film. During his search, Jason gradually gets lost in a nightmare.

Mood Indigo

Based on the novel by Boris Vian, Mood Indigo sees French writer-director Michel Gondry returning to his wild, imaginative, and romantic roots. Colin (Romain Duris) is living a colorful life in Paris—he’s wealthy, he enjoys the company and comfort of his offbeat friends (Omar Sy, Gad Elmaleh), and is excited about his latest invention, the pianocktail (a piano that produces quality cocktails). One day, one of Colin’s friends admits that he’s fallen head-over-heels in love with an American woman. Envious and suddenly anxious out of loneliness, Colin wants the same. At a party, he meets the elegant Chloe (Audrey Tautou) and the two tumble into a whirlwind of jazz-dancing, ice-skating, city-sweeping romance. They fall in love and get married, but are suddenly confronted with the news of Chloe’s strange illness—she’s begun to grow a flower inside her lungs. As Chloe’s health deteriorates, so does her relationship with Colin. [Synopsis courtesy of Seattle International Film Festival]

The Taste of Others

Agnès Jaoui co-writes and directs this romantic comedy of manners set in France’s rustic Provence. Unpolished and ultra-pragmatic industrialist Jean-Jacques Castella (co-scripter Jean-Pierre Bacri) reluctantly attends Racine’s tragedy “Berenice” in order to see his niece play a bit part. He is taken with the play’s strangely familiar-looking leading lady Clara Devaux (Anne Alvaro). During the course of the show, Castella soon remembers that he once hired and then promptly fired the actress as an English language tutor. He immediately goes out and signs up for language lessons. Thinking that he is nothing but an ill-tempered philistine with bad taste, Clara rejects him until Castella charms her off her feet.