Fun Size

Wren (Victoria Justice) is invited to a Halloween party by her crush, Aaron Riley (Thomas McDonell), but she is also forced by her mother (Chelsea Handler) to take her oddball little brother Albert (Jackson Nicoll) with her when she goes out trick-or-treating on Halloween. When she goes to the party instead, she loses him and must find him before her mother finds out.

Robot and Frank

A delightful dramatic comedy, a buddy picture, and, for good measure, a heist film. Curmudgeonly old Frank lives by himself. His routine involves daily visits to his local library, where he has a twinkle in his eye for the librarian. His grown children are concerned about their father’s well-being and buy him a caretaker robot. Initially resistant to the idea, Frank soon appreciates the benefits of robotic support – like nutritious meals and a clean house – and eventually begins to treat his robot like a true companion. With his robot’s assistance, Frank’s passion for his old, unlawful profession is reignited, for better or worse.


Dare follows three very-different teenagers through the last semester of high school. There are Alexa (Emmy Rossum), the overachieving good girl who longs to break out of her shell; Ben (Ashley Springer), the melancholy outsider confused about his sexuality; and Johnny (Zach Gilford), the rich kid who has everything, including good looks, but hides behind his bad-boy persona. This unlikely trio fall into each other’s lives and each other’s arms, making a last-ditch effort to shake things up before they actually have to start living as adults. Director Adam Salky and writer David Brind takes us into some uncharted territory with fresh eyes and matter-of-fact authority. Sweet and sexy don’t always go together, but they work beautifully in this instance because the sexuality of the film is cleverly woven into the fabric of the story. You can ask why the kids are in such a hurry to experience adult feelings, especially when their parents, comically enough, are afraid to get in the way. All is answered in the nuanced performances of this exceptional cast. They capture perfectly a generation with nothing to rebel against except their self-imposed inhibitions. By being keenly perceptive, director Salky stacks up countless priceless moments in crafting teen romance with a decidedly modern spin. In Dare, the kids do what they need to do to become the adults they should. [Synopsis courtesy of the Sundance Film Festival.]

Geography Club

At Goodkind High School, a group of students of varying sexual orientation form an after-school club a as a discrete way to share their feelings and experiences.


Two teens battle their way through a religious apocalypse on a mission to defeat the Antichrist.


The story follows what happens when a child psychologist surprises his girlfriend by showing up at her political family’s annual get-together at their Sag Harbor vacation home only to find them desperately in need of therapy.