Heal the Living

Heal the Living

Ivory Coast-born filmmaker Katell Quillévére adapts Maylis de Kerangal’s Booker Prize–longlisted novel for this elegant and affecting film which draws three seemingly unrelated stories together into a tale about the moment when tragedy meets hope. [Synopsis courtesy of Toronto International Film Festival]


The story of three close friends who are involved in a love-triangle. [Synopsis provided by imdb]

J’ai tué ma mère (I Killed My Mother)

In a triple-threat feat, Dolan writes, directs and stars in J’ai tué ma mère, the semi-autobiographical tale of a young gay man coming of age while struggling with his tortured relationship with his mother.

Dolan plays Hubert, a cool and composed teenager who sports a Tears for Fears throwback hairdo. He bickers constantly with mom (Anne Dorval) about anything and everything, from the trivial to the profound. He’s also repulsed by her style – the plastic on the furniture, her repeated trips to the tanning salon. Not only is she disagreeable and unsupportive, but she’s also a kitsch monster. Their arguments are alternately hilarious and horrifying, reflecting the profound pain both mother and son are suffering through. When his teacher asks the class to write about what their mother does, Hubert can’t imagine even acknowledging he has one – so he writes that his mother is dead, managing to bury her in at least one part of his imagination.

Their fights escalate until mom hatches a toxic plan: Hubert will be shipped off to boarding school. He is aghast but has little choice, as mom has managed to convince her ex-husband that a change of scenery is in the lad’s best interests. Being banished to a mother-free zone might have seemed a good option for Hubert, but the move simply leads to an ultimate standoff between them. Dolan and Dorval navigate their way through the harried, increasingly vicious tête-à-têtes with delicacy, evoking sympathy for both characters. [Synopsis courtesy of the TIFF]


Sometimes, we’re just waiting for a miracle. A nurse who is a Jehovah’s Witness, grows fond of the miracle survivor of a plane crash. Two sexagenarians, a bartender and a parking lot attendant want to explore their forbidden passions. A conservative, well-off couple drown their disappointments in booze and gambling. And a man does his utmost to make amends for an irredeemable action, bringing us to a plane bound for Cuba. An ensemble film where every character affects the lives of others.


A widowed single mom finds herself burdened with the full-time custody of her explosive 15-year-old ADHD son. As they try to make ends meet and struggle with their impetuous and unpredictable ménage, the new girl across the street, Kyla, benevolently offers needed support. Together, they find a new sense of balance, and hope is regained. [Synopsis courtesy of Cannes Film Festival]