Life is a Long Quiet River

Two babies are switched at birth. When the mistake is discovered 12 years later, it leads to complications in the lives of both families. One family is affluent, with dutiful and (apparently) contented children. The other family is poor, with rambunctious (even delinquent) children, often hungry, but with lots of laughter in the house.

Little White Lies

Ron “Tater Salad” White has been Drunk In Public. He tried to Fix Stupid. No one argues he has Behavioral Problems, and now he is ” A Little Unprofessional.” With cigar in one hand and a glass of scotch in the other, the Blue Collar Comedy Tour alum delivers 80 hilarious minutes of all new material with his signature, irreverent storytelling style and the best comedic timing in the business. Filmed live at the Paramount Theatre in Austin, TX.

Special Forces

Afghanistan. War correspondent Elsa Casanova is taken hostage by the Taliban. Faced with her imminent execution, a Special Forces unit is dispatched to free her. In some of the world’s most breathtaking yet hostile landscapes, a relentless pursuit begins between her kidnappers who have no intention of letting their prey escape them and a group of soldiers who risk their lives in pursuit of their single aim – to bring her home alive. This strong, independent woman and these men of duty are thrown together and forced to confront situations of great danger that inextricably bind them – emotionally, violently and intimately.

La Haine

When he was just 29 years old, Matthieu Kassovitz took the international film world by storm with La Haine (Hate), a gritty, unsettling, and visually explosive look at the racial and cultural volatility in modern-day France, specifically in the low-income banlieue districts on Paris’s outskirts. Aimlessly whiling away their days in the concrete environs of their dead-end suburbia, Vinz, Hubert, and Said — a Jew, African, and an Arab — give human faces to France’s immigrant populations, their bristling resentment at their social marginalization slowly simmering until it reaches a climactic boiling point. A work of tough beauty, La Haine is a landmark of contemporary French cinema and a gripping reflection of its country’s ongoing identity crisis.

Standing Tall (La Tête haute)

Sixteen-year-old Malony (Rod Paradot) is surrounded by adults both callous and supportive. On the latter side is a warm-hearted court judge Florence Blaque (Catherine Deneuve) and a devoted social worker Yann (Benoît Magimel, The Piano Teacher); on the other side stand most other authority figures. Clearly a victim of circumstances and poor parenting from his basket case of a mother (Sara Forestier, The Names of Love), he’s also a bully, a brute, and a sexually violent offender.

The Connection

Marseille, 1975. Pierre Michel, a young police magistrate with a wife and children, has just been transferred to help crack down on the city’s organized crime. He decides to take on the French Connection, a Mafia-run operation that exports heroin all over the world. Not paying heed to any warnings, he leads a one-man campaign against Mafia kingpin Gaëtan Zampa, the most untouchable godfather of all. But Pierre Michel soon discovers that to get results he will have to change his methods. [Synopsis courtesy of Toronto International Film Festival]

For A Woman

After the death of her mother, Anne makes a shocking discovery: an old photograph casts doubt on her origins and leads her to discover a mysterious uncle who lived with her parents after the war. As she lifts the lid on a long forgotten family secret, the young woman learns that her mother once succumbed to an amorous passion that was as intense as it was short-lived…