As America enters a second decade of war, many soldiers feel misperceived, unrecognized, and unsure where they belong when they return. Homecoming shows a rare glimpse of a female soldiers story – a view one seldom finds in cinema. In this AMC Theatres Kansas City Best US/International Narrative Feature, writer/director Sean Hackett strays away from war film “hot topics” (injury, PTSD, politics) and instead focuses on the broader subject of what these soldiers sacrifice – their 20s. By turns hilarious and heartbreaking, this authentic and acute portrait shows Estelle redefining “home.”


Clue finds six colorful dinner guests gathered at the mansion of their host, Mr. Boddy — who turns up dead after his secret is exposed: He was blackmailing all of them. With the killer among them, the guests and Boddy’s chatty butler must suss out the culprit before the body count rises.

Knock Knock

Evan Webber (Keanu Reeves) is living the dream. Just look at his beautiful, successful wife, his two wonderful kids, and his truly stunning house—which he designed himself. Of course he did. Things are going so well, Evan doesn’t even mind spending Father’s Day alone while the rest of his family heads out for a beach weekend. And then there’s a knock on the door.

The two young women (Lorenza Izzo and Ana de Armas) standing on Evan’s doorstep are where Evan’s dream takes a nightmarish turn. [Synopsis courtesy of Sundance Film Festival]

Palo Alto

Palo Alto weaves together three stories of teenage lust, boredom, and self-destruction: shy, sensitive April (Emma Roberts), torn between an illicit flirtation with her soccer coach (James Franco) and an unrequited crush on sweet stoner Teddy (Jack Kilmer); Emily (Zoe Levin), who offers sexual favors to any boy to cross her path; and the increasingly dangerous exploits of Teddy and his best friend Fred (Nat Wolff), whose behavior may or may not be sociopathic. One of the strongest American directorial debuts of the past decade, Coppola’s film has a palpable sense of time and place, but her characters — seeking cheap thrills and meaningful connections — could be teenagers from any generation.