Rose Pamphyle, 21, is determined to break free from her stifling existence. Living with her widowed father and dreary husband, she seems destined to remain a bored housewife. That is, until she applies for a job at an insurance agency and her charismatic boss offers her a job – provided she compete in a speed typing tournament.

I love you

In another indictment of the flaws of our so-called civilization, this satire from the late director (Marco Ferreri) features (Christopher Lambert) as Michel, a miserable man who has failed at love and finds solace in a mechanical key holder. Michel has just been dumped by Barbara (Anemone) because he has not been able to get her pregnant. He is feeling pretty low when he finds a key holder with blue eyes and big red lips that responds to the sound of a whistle with “I Love You.” Michel tacks this gadget up on his TV set and whistles away. He seems happy with this fool-proof declaration of love until one day, the key holder responds to the neighbor’s whistle and Michel goes berserk. After all, if your key ring can’t be faithful, what’s the world coming to?

Grand Départ

A tender coming of age story of two brothers thrown into turmoil by their father’s declining health, GRAND DÉPART reveals a young man looking to his future, while struggling with his past. Between his domineering brother Luc (Jérémie Elkaïm) and his incorrigible father (César winner Eddy Mitchell), Romain (Pio Marmaï) finds that he can’t go on being the boy who does what is expected of him. Approaching 30, Romain decides that it’s time to face his family as an adult and, in the process, learn more about himself than he ever imagined.

We Love You, You Bastard

French rock icon Johnny Hallyday plays Jacques, a retired war photographer attempting to live a peaceful life in the Alps. With a new girlfriend, Nathalie, he appears content, but his old friend Frédéric, played by another singing idol, Eddy Mitchell, knows better. There is a little matter of four daughters, each one from a different conquest, each one estranged from him, and each leaving their shadow on Jacques’ emotional life. Realizing that reconciliation is the thing Jacques craves most, Frédéric, a doctor, concocts a little lie to convince the daughters to visit their absentee father. Well, not so little. In fact, it’s a really big lie, and as the family gathers, as accounts are settled through tears and laughter, the lie gets harder and harder to retract. [Synopsis courtesy of COLCOA]