City Island

Meet the Rizzos, a family that might get along a lot better if only they could tell each other the truth. Dad Vince is the worst offender. But since the prison guard won’t even admit that poker night is in fact acting class, how’s he ever going to explain about his illegitimate son? His daughter works as a stripper when she’s supposed to be in college, while young Vinnie Jr has a secret sexual fetish that involves a 24-hour webcam and the family’s 300-pound neighbour. Vince’s wife Joyce is the family’s rock, but it’s been a year since she enjoyed intimacy with her husband, and it’s no surprise she thinks poker night spells A-F-F-A-I-R. When former prisoner Tony enters the Rizzos’ lives, Joyce begins to suspect that the handsome young Tony isn’t who Vince says he is. City Island is a funny, touching and smart family tale about the secrets of the past catching up with the lies of the present, and accepting that nobody’s perfect – least of all your loved ones. [Synopsis courtesy of IMDb]

Hugo

Hugo is an orphan boy living in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. He learned to fix clocks and other gadgets from his father and uncle which he puts to use keeping the train station clocks running. The only thing that he has left that connects him to his dead father is an automaton (mechanical man) that doesn’t work without a special key which Hugo needs to find to unlock the secret he believes it contains. On his adventures, he meets with a shopkeeper, George Melies, who works in the train station and his adventure-seeking god-daughter. Hugo finds that they have a surprising connection to his father and the automaton, and he discovers it unlocks some memories the old man has buried inside regarding his past.

Harry Brown

Michael Caine is Harry Brown. If that sentence carries a hint of action-movie menace, it’s not entirely misplaced. Caine’s Harry is eventually roused to awesome and satisfying vengeance, but this film begins in more troubling, nuanced territory.

Harry Brown lives alone, shut away in one of Britain’s bleak public-housing apartment blocks. As his wife lives out her last days in the hospital, Harry restricts his activities to games of chess in the pub with Leonard, his last best friend. All around them swarms chaos. Their housing estate has been taken over by warring gangs that deal drugs and settle scores with impunity. The police, represented here by upright detective Frampton (Emily Mortimer) and her cynical partner Hicock (Charlie Creed-Miles), are reduced to simply informing the victims’ families when the latest shooting or knifing occurs – visits that Hicock calls death-o-grams. [Synopsis courtesy of TIFF]

Our Idiot Brother

Everybody has one. The sibling who is always just a little bit behind the curve when it comes to getting his life together. For sisters Liz (Emily Mortimer), Miranda (Elizabeth Banks) and Natalie (Zooey Deschanel), that person is their perennially upbeat brother Ned (Paul Rudd), an erstwhile organic farmer whose willingness to rely on the honesty of mankind is a less-than-optimum strategy for a tidy, trouble-free existence. Ned may be utterly lacking in common sense, but he is their brother and so, after his girlfriend dumps him and boots him off the farm, his sisters once again come to his rescue. As Liz, Miranda and Natalie each take a turn at housing Ned, their brother’s unfailing commitment to honesty creates more than a few messes in their comfortable routines. But as each of their lives begins to unravel, Ned’s family comes to realize that maybe, in believing and trusting the people around him, Ned isn’t such an idiot after all.

Shutter Island

World War II soldier-turned-U.S. marshal Teddy Daniels investigates the disappearance of a patient from a hospital for the criminally insane, but his efforts are compromised by his own troubling visions and by Dr. Cawley.

Ten Thousand Saints

Jude Keffy-Horn—named after a Beatles song by his hippie parents—spends his high school days in small-town Vermont getting high with his best friend Teddy. Beneath Jude’s mind-numbing activities lurks a desire to reconnect with his estranged father, Les, who abandoned the family when Jude was nine. When Teddy dies of an overdose on the last day of 1987, Jude’s mother sends him to live with Les in New York City’s roiling and raw East Village. As Jude struggles to establish an identity within the cultural upheaval downtown, he forms an unlikely surrogate family with Teddy’s straight-edge brother, and a troubled, rich uptown girl. [Synopsis courtesy of Sundance Film Festival]

Howl’s Moving Castle

When Sophie, a shy young woman, is cursed with an old body by a spiteful witch, her only chance of breaking the spell lies with a self-indulgent yet insecure young wizard and his companions in his legged, walking home.

Lars and the Real Girl

Sometimes you find love where you’d least expect it. Just ask Lars (Academy Award Nominee, Ryan Gosling), a sweet but quirky guy who thinks he’s found the girl of his dreams in a life-sized doll named Bianca. Lars is completely content with his artificial girlfriend, but when he develops feelings for Margo, an attractive co-worker, Lars finds himself lost in a hilariously unique love triangle, hoping to somehow discover the real meaning of true love. You’ll be swept off your feet by Lars And The Real Girl, hailed as “One of the Year’s 10 Best” by The Associated Press.

Leonie

In the lush tradition of the glorious films of Merchant and Ivory, comes the true life story of Leonie Gilmour (Emily Mortimer), whose life crossed continents, wars and cultures, embodied with courage and passion in search of art and freedom. A tender and inspiring story of a remarkable woman who nurtures the amazing artistic talent of her son who has only one way to succeed and one person to guide him, as he grows into the world renown artist, Isamu Noguchi.