The Dancer

Nothing in her background destined Loïe Fuller from the American Midwest to become a Belle Epoque icon, even less a dancer at the Paris Opera. Even at the risk of destroying her back and burning her eyes with the stage lights, she will never falter in the quest to perfect her dance. But her encounter with Isadora Duncan, a prodigious young dancer hungry for fame and glory, will precipitate the fall of this icon at the beginning of the twentieth century.

The Rabbi’s Cat

Based on the best-selling graphic novel by Joann Sfar, The Rabbi’s Cat tells the story of a rabbi and his talking cat, a sharp-tongued feline philosopher brimming with scathing humor and a less than pure love for the rabbi’s teenage daughter. Algeria in the 1920s is an intersection of Jewish, Arab and French culture. A cat belonging to a widowed rabbi and his beautiful daughter, Zlabya, eats the family parrot and miraculously gains the ability to speak. With the power of speech comes unparalleled sardonic wit as the cat question’s faith, tradition and authority in a provocative exploration of God, lust, death, phrenology, religious intolerance, love, and the search for truth. Rich with the colors, textures, flavors and music of Mediterranean Africa, the film embarks on a cross continent adventure from the tiled terraces, fountains, quays and cafes of colonial Algiers to Maghrebi tent camps, dusty trading outposts, and deep blue Saharan nights in search of a lost Ethiopian city.


Adapting his own eponymous best-selling novel for the screen, David Foenkinos co-directed the whimsical and romantic drama with his brother, Stéphane Foenkinos.

Audrey Tautou is Nathalie, a beautiful, happy, and successful Parisian business executive who finds herself suddenly widowed after a three-year marriage to her soul mate. To cope with her loss, she buries herself and her emotions in her work to the dismay of her friends, family and co-workers. One day, inexplicably, her zest for life and love is rekindled by a most unlikely source, her seemingly unexceptional, gauche, and average looking office subordinate, Markus (French comic star Francois Damiens, Heartbreaker).

At first stunned by Nathalie’s unexpected attention, Markus comes to gradually believe in her feelings and shifts into romantic high gear. As their relationship goes from awkward to genuinely loving, Nathalie and Markus will have to overcome a host of obstacles including everyone else’s judgmental perceptions as well as their own self-doubts. [Synopsis courtesy of ComingSoon]


Charming, funny and effortlessly cool, Alex (Romain Duris) is a professional Don Juan who makes a living breaking up couples with his sister Mélanie (Julie Ferrier of MICMACS). Because business is slow, they go against their principles to break up only unhappy couples and agree to work for M. Van Der Bercq. Alex has only one week to stop the wealthy man’s daughter Juliette (Vanessa Paradis) from marrying the man she is madly in love with. Alex is soon thrown into his own hilarious seduction “mission impossible” that risks him being caught by his ruthless personal creditors, angry exes and the beautiful and independent Juliette herself. But worst of all, will he discover to his own cost that when it comes to love, the perfect plan doesn’t exist?

The Brand New Testament

“God exists. He lives in Brussels. He is horrible to his wife and daughter. We’ve heard a lot about his son but precious little about his daughter. I’m his daughter. My name is Ea and I’m ten. To get even, I’ve sent everyone in the world an SMS with their date of death….” [Synopsis courtesy of Directors’ Fortnight]

Les Cowboys

Set amidst a sub-culture of Western enthusiasts in rural France, Alain (François Damiens) attends a cowboy fair with his wife (Agathe Dronne) and children—sixteen-year-old daughter, Kelly (Iliana Zabeth), and young son, Kid (Finnegan Oldfield). When Kelly disappears amidst the chaos of the festivities, Alain’s initial fear quickly turns to anger and disbelief as it becomes increasingly clear that his daughter has willingly abandoned her life to begin anew as a Muslim with her boyfriend. Convinced that she was coerced, Alain devotes what’s left of his broken existence to finding her, eventually bestowing the responsibility of the search onto his son.


Like the titular song by Leonard Cohen, Suzanne is ultimately about a state of mind, a study in finding a sliver of grace amongst the heaps of garbage life can throw at you. Suzanne is close to her family, but between her widower father and her quiet sister, she is the troublemaker of the bunch. Restless and quixotic, her forgiving family endlessly endures the consequences of her dreams, her whims, and her bad choices. Largely set in 1990s Marseilles, the story elliptically pogo-dances through 25 years of Suzanne’s turbulent life: childhood, early pregnancy, single parenting, and above all, her driving love for an aspiring bad boy. [Synopsis courtesy of COLCOA]

Tango Libre

A prison guard is attracted to a woman at his weekly tango class. They meet again when she visits her husband in the prison where he works and he is drawn into her complicated romantic life. Meanwhile the prisoners are learning the tango.

Gare du Nord

Paris, North Station, anything comes by, even trains. One would like to stay, but they have to hurry up… Like other thousands lives crossing, Ismael, Mathilde, Sacha and Joan are going to meet here...

Tip Top

Two policewomen from Internal Affairs arrive in a provincial precinct to investigate the death of an Algerian woman who was an informer. One punches, the other eyes, tip top.