Thunderbolt and Lightfoot

Thunderbolt and Lightfoot tells the tale of two outlaws, their friendship, and a robbery that goes awry. Eastwood’s character, an ex-con and present-day cowtown preacher is hiding from his old partners who believe they were conned out of their share. So Eastwood finds himself reluctantly teaming up with Jeff Bridges’s character, a young drifter who can help him escape.

Another Happy Day

A wedding at her parents’ Annapolis estate hurls high-strung Lynn into the fire of primal, Byzantine family dynamics. It’s the wedding of Lynn’s son, whom she was deprived of raising because of her acrimonious divorce, and a feud still rages between Lynn and her ex-husband’s hot-tempered wife. Meanwhile, the three children Lynn did raise display a panoply of disturbing behaviors like cutting and drug addiction, which Lynn’s mother and sisters alternately ridicule and blame her for. As Lynn attempts catharsis, her mother sweeps issues under the rug, but painful truths bubble and spurt. Clan members deploy ricocheting arrows to protect themselves—and wound others—as the fine lines between victims and perpetrators blur.

Many films have tread the terrain of upper-class family dysfunction, but few marshal as much sensitivity, rawness, and truth—and few performances penetrate as deeply as those of Ellen Barkin, Ellen Burstyn, and Ezra Miller as they navigate the emotional minefields of unmet needs that span generations. [Synopsis courtesy of the Sundance Institute]

Lost Horizon

This retelling of the classic tale of James Hilton’s Utopian lost world plays out uneasily amid musical production numbers and Bacharach pop music. While escaping war-torn China, a group of Europeans crash in the Himalayas, where they are rescued and taken to the mysterious Valley of the Blue Moon, Shangri-La. Hidden from the rest of the world, Shangri-La is a haven of peace and tranquility for world-weary diplomat Richard Conway. His ambitious brother, George, sees it as a prison from which he must escape, even if it means risking his life and bringing destruction to the ancient culture of Shangri-La.

The Naked Gun 2½: The Smell of Fear

Bumbling cop Frank Drebin is out to foil the big boys in the energy industry, who intend to suppress technology that will put them out of business. As always, the jokes (and sight gags) fly like gunfire!

The Naked Gun 33⅓: The Final Insult

Frank Drebin is persuaded out of retirement to go undercover in a state prison. There he is to find out what top terrorist, Rocco, has planned for when he escapes. Frank’s wife, Jane, is desperate for a baby.. this adds to Frank’s problems. A host of celebrities at the Academy awards ceremony are humiliated by Frank as he blunders his way trying to foil Rocco.