Romantics Anonymous

A recent surprise hit in France, the delectable comedy “Romantics Anonymous” tells the story of Angélique Delange (Isabelle Carré, “Private Fears in Public Places”), an unemployed but gifted chocolate-maker with a lifelong case of uncontrollable shyness that prevents her from properly sharing her confectionary talents. Jean-René Van Den Hugde (Benoît Poelvoorde, “Coco Before Chanel”) suffers from a similar case of terminal abashment and runs a fledgling chocolate company in desperate need of a new direction. When Jean-René hires Angélique as the new sales associate, the two nervous Nellies must face their deepest fears. With the chocolate business hanging in the balance, they are forced to fess up to their hidden sweet affections for each other.

Co-screenwriters Jean-Pierre Améris and Philippe Blasband have prepared a deliciously witty script filled with rich characters that are packed with honesty and humor. Director Améris teases out the fairy-tale quality of this timid romance while grounding the film’s charm and spirit firmly in its lovable and authentic protagonists and their quest for emotional freedom. Carré and Poelvoorde give nuanced and hilarious performances and radiate on-screen chemistry.

Le Refuge

Darlene and her daughter Victoria seek refuge at a remote rural safe house for abused women that’s run by the strict and tough, but folksy and supportive Bea. Things turn sour when Bea proves to be a total lunatic with an especially dangerous influence on the impressionable Victoria.

Marie’s Story

At the turn of the 19th century, the daughter of a humble artisan and his wife is born deaf and blind and unable to communicate with the world around her. Desperate to find a cnonection to young Marie adn avoid sending her to an asylum, the Heurtins send her to the Larnay Institute in central France, where an order of Catholic nuns manage a school for deaf girls. There, the idealistic Sister Marguerite sees in Marie a unique potential, and despite her Mother Superior’s skepticism, vows to bring the wild young thing out of the darkness into which she was born.

Breathe

Charlie is seventeen and bored. Her estranged parents are too caught up in their own drama to pay much attention to her. School holds no surprises either and Charlie grows tired of her staid friends. Enter Sarah, a hip new transfer student who brings with her an alluring air of boldness and danger. The two girls form an instant connection. Sarah brings the excitement Charlie so desperately seeks, and Charlie is a stable influence on the wild child. Through shared secrets, love interests and holiday getaways, their relationship deepens to levels of unspoken intimacy, which eventually leads to jealousy and unrealistic expectations, and the teens soon find themselves on a trajectory toward a jarring outcome.

The Day of the Crows

In a cabin of the deep of the forest, a child and his father leas a wild and hard life in utmost isolation. The child grows up fearing and admiring his father, with the ghosts haunting the forest as his only companions. Until the day he discovers the neighbouring village and meets a young girl there, Manon. At her side, he discovers that love exists. From then on he won’t cease to search for the place where his father’s love for him is hiding.