Of Gods and Men (Des hommes et des dieux)

A group of Catholic monks reside in the monastery of Tibhirine, where they live in harmony with the largely muslim population of Algeria. When a bloody conflict between Algeria’s army and Muslim Jihadi insurgents disrupts the peace, they are forced to consider fleeing the monastery and deserting the villagers they have ministered to. In the face of deadly violence the monks wrestle with their faith and their convictions, eventually deciding to stay and help their neighbours keep the army and the insurgents at bay.

La Princesse de Montpensier

1562, la France est sous le règne de Charles IX, les guerres de religion font rage… Depuis son plus jeune âge, Marie de Mézières aime Henri, Duc de Guise. Elle est contrainte par son père d’épouser le Prince de Montpensier. Son mari, appelé par Charles IX à rejoindre les princes dans leur guerre contre les protestants, la laisse en compagnie de son précepteur, le Comte de Chabannes, loin du monde, au château de Champigny. Elle tente en vain d’y oublier sa passion pour Guise, mais devient malgré elle l’enjeu de passions rivales et violentes auxquelles vient aussi se mêler le Duc d’Anjou, futur Henri III.

You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet

From beyond the grave, celebrated playwright Antoine d’Anthac gathers together all his friends who have appeared over the years in his play “Eurydice”. These actors watch a recording of the work performed by a young acting company, La Compagnie de la Colombe. Do love, life, death and love after death still have any place on a theater stage? It’s up to them to decide. And the surprises have only just begun… [Synopsis courtesy of official Cannes website]

The Princess of Montpensier

Bertrand Tavernier (“’Round Midnight”) directs this lush, unsentimental take on the historical romance, which takes a clear-eyed look at the intersection of passion and power in 16th-century France. Young, beautiful aristocrat Marie favors war hero Henri, but she’s married off to the Prince of Montpensier for political reasons. Once at court, she inspires love, violence, and thirst for power in the men around her as civil war tears the country apart. [Synopsis courtesy of Chicago Film Festival]

Suite Française

France, 1940. In the first days of occupation, beautiful Lucile Angellier is trapped in a stifled existence with her controlling mother-in-law as they both await news of her husband: a prisoner of war. Parisian refugees start to pour into their small town, soon followed by a regiment of German soldiers who take up residence in the villagers’ own homes. Lucile initially tries to ignore Bruno von Falk, the handsome and refined German officer staying with them. But soon, a powerful love draws them together and leads them into the tragedy of war.

Barbecue

On his 50th birthday, a man who’s been watching his weight, health and temper all his life suffers a heart attack. He’s been doing everything he was told he should do and it still didn’t help. He decides to turn the page and let loose.

5 to 7

Young aspiring novelist Brian (Anton Yelchin) meets Arielle (Berenice Marlohe), the sophisticated wife of a French Diplomat. They soon embark on a “cinq-a-sept” affair that challenges Brian’s traditional American ideas of love and relationships. A cosmopolitan comedy of manners told with surprising warmth and lightness, 5 to 7 marks writer and producer Levin’s (Mad Men) directorial debut. [Synopsis courtesy of Tribeca Film Festival]

Rendez-vous

A woman and three men. Nina, who’s come to Paris to act and sleeps with any man at hand, meets Paulot, a young estate agent; he’s smitten. She also meets Paulot’s flatmate Quentin, a compulsive who stalks her. To Paulot’s jealous dismay, she’s willing to sleep with Quentin, and wants Paulot’s friendship. After a desperate act by Quentin, Nina and Paulot share a flat, but she still won’t take him as a lover; instead, her energy goes into a production of “Romeo and Juliet” directed by a detached, intense man who becomes her father figure. Quentin’s ghost taunts her, Paulot wants to end all contact, and the director plans to return to London. The art of the theater may be her only refuge.