Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?

Introverted Weichung has been married to Feng for nine years. They have one son together, and Feng would like to have another child with him. One day Stephen, an old friend who now organises weddings, appears and encourages Weichung to return to the gay life he had previously. Anxious not to lose his wife, Weichung tentatively begins seeing a flight attendant behind Feng’s back.
Weichung’s impulsive sister Mandy dumps her fiancée San-San in the middle of a supermarket. She is equally at a loss and dreams of being with a soap star. Good-natured but desperate San-San tries to woo her back with ever more romantic ideas. While Stephen and even Feng’s mother persist in meddling in the couples’ affairs, Feng becomes an independent woman.
Chen Arvin’s charming film brings classical approaches to partnerships into playful disarray. He comically opens up the borders of the nuclear family, integrating it into a diverse community which manages to strike a balance between independence and the forming of bonds, friendship and sexual fulfilment. [Courtesy of Berlinale]

Murmur of the Hearts

Not Louis Malle’s classic but the latest from director Sylvia Chang who, after years of absence from the helm, digs deep into her Taiwanese roots to tell a story about growing up, and letting go. Isabella Leong plays an uncertain painter, Mei, who drifted apart from her tour guide brother after leaving Liudau, the off-shore island of Taiwan, with their mother. Mei falls for an underachieving boxer, and begins years of soul searching in the city, where the siblings reunite under unexpected circumstances. What was remembered and forgotten are lessons that have profound consequences in this emotional drama.

Yi Yi

Each member of a family in Taipei asks hard questions about life’s meaning as they live through everyday quandaries.