Young Argentine auteur Matías Piñeiro continues his fascination with Shakespeare in this dazzling riff on Twelfth Night, which launches a host of intersecting characters into a roundelay of dalliances, intrigues and burgeoning revelations. (TIFF)

Lo Que Mas Quiero (What I Most Want)

“Lo Que Mas Quiero,” Delfina Castagnino’s stunning feature film debut, is a heartfelt and sincere portrayal of two young women experiencing profound bereavement. Shot in Bariloche, in the Argentine Patagonia, the film is embedded in the natural world, providing the necessary physical space for the characters to contemplate their present and future.

Maria (Maria Villar) visits her friend Pilar (Pilar Gamboa) who has recently lost her father and lives alone in Bariloche. While Pilar is coming to terms with her loss, Maria too is mourning the loss of love she once had with her boyfriend. Escaping the trap of Buenos Aires, she finds the trip south providing the necessary change to realize that her relationship is coming to an end. And there’s a local boy, Diego (Esteban Lamothe), who offers Maria a wonderful distraction from her problems.

As Maria and Pilar spend their days visiting markets and lakes, cooking dinners and drinking wine, they struggle to accept the changes that their new circumstances demand. Drawing closer together more through shared experience than direct conversation, their companionship brings them both strength and comfort. The film observes key moments in their time together, each captured with beauty and simplicity.

The Argentine Patagonia is a present character in the film, provoking strikingly different responses from the urban Maria and from Pilar, more at ease in the natural world. Expertly shot and wholly original, “Lo Que Mas Quiero” signals the emergence of yet another unique voice from Argentina. [Synopsis by Diana Sanchez/Toronto International Film Festival]

The Princess of France

Young Argentine auteur Matías Piñeiro follows up his international sensation Viola with the latest of his revisionist takes on the Shakespearean canon, deliciously detailing how life begins to imitate art when a Buenos Aires theatre company mounts a radio version of Love’s Labour’s Lost. [Synopsis courtesy of Toronto International Film Festival]

They All Lie

A group of girls and boys in their twenties settle in a country house that seems completely isolated from civilization. One of them writes a novel while the others try to become a gang and prepare a robbery; some fall in love, or seem to be, or believe (or say) they are in love. But these two, three, ten plot lines unfold from what the characters hide or just don’t know, connecting the writing of the novel and the forming of the gang, and the past of two of the characters with that of the house, and of those who perhaps were the two most bitter enemies of nineteenth century Argentine history.

El hombre robado

Piñeiro’s sparkling debut film breathlessly follows a clever, capricious young woman as she carefully interweaves friends and lovers into an intricate web of secretive yet often unexpectedly compassionate games. Together with her best friend and fellow tour guide at a rival Buenos Aires historical museum, Piñeiro’s headstrong heroine attempts to tame the unpredictable course of her heart, eccentrically drawing inspiration from Sarmiento’s magnum opus, Facundo. With its grainy 16mm black-and-white cinematography, its political sub- and super-texts and its compelling portrait of impetuous youth, The Stolen Man recalls the alternately sober and sprightly nouvelle vague of Jean Eustache and Jacques Rivette. [Source — Harvard Film Archive]


A group of actors travel to an island in Tigre to rehearse William Shakespeare’s As You Like It. Luisa, who plays Rosalind in the play, terminates a current romantic relationship over her cell phone. During preparations she alternates between rehearsing and daydreaming, and starts to slowly embody Rosalind, transforming into the object of desire of other cast members on the island. During those sun-soaked hours, love strikes between the players and the roles between actress and character confuse themselves in a rare mixing of joyful artifice and anguishing uncertainty. But once rehearsals are over and everyone returns to reality, the romantic bliss between the cast members and their own partners awakens in her a, foolish and irrepressible, desire to long and hope for a phone call.