Le Cancre

Laurent is seeking a path in life after living his childhood and teenage years in laziness. He has a conflictual relationship with Rodolphe, his father and both are too emotional to express their mutual affection. Despite the women of his life hanging around him , Rodolphe has but one obsession: meeting Marguerite again, the first love of his life. [Synopsis courtesy of Cannes Film Festival]

The Rabbi’s Cat

Based on the best-selling graphic novel by Joann Sfar, The Rabbi’s Cat tells the story of a rabbi and his talking cat, a sharp-tongued feline philosopher brimming with scathing humor and a less than pure love for the rabbi’s teenage daughter. Algeria in the 1920s is an intersection of Jewish, Arab and French culture. A cat belonging to a widowed rabbi and his beautiful daughter, Zlabya, eats the family parrot and miraculously gains the ability to speak. With the power of speech comes unparalleled sardonic wit as the cat question’s faith, tradition and authority in a provocative exploration of God, lust, death, phrenology, religious intolerance, love, and the search for truth. Rich with the colors, textures, flavors and music of Mediterranean Africa, the film embarks on a cross continent adventure from the tiled terraces, fountains, quays and cafes of colonial Algiers to Maghrebi tent camps, dusty trading outposts, and deep blue Saharan nights in search of a lost Ethiopian city.

Chicken with Plums

Tehran, 1958: Nasser Ali Khan, the most celebrated violin player, has his beloved instrument broken. Unable to find another to replace it, life without music seems intolerable. He stays in bed and slips further and further into his reveries from his youth to his own children‟s futures. Over the course of the week that follows, and as the pieces of this captivating story fall into place, we understand his poignant secret and the profundity of his decision to give up life for music and love. [Synopsis courtesy of TIFF]

The Silence of Joan (Jeanne captive)

In 1430, Joan of Arc, the prisoner of a powerful lord of the north of France is sold to the English. As a captive awaiting her death, she is approached by different men for whom she is believed to be the embodiment of the infinite.

Les Derniers jours du monde

Robinson, appropriately named as we will soon discover, is on vacation in Biarritz with his wife. What follows is the story behind the loss of his arm, a story that becomes increasingly bizarre and eventually apocalyptic, leading us down a narrative path of labyrinthine complexity. The resulting film is an extraordinary feat of imagination and daring, set against the backdrop of a world on the verge of destruction. Alors que s’annonce la fin du monde, Robinson Laborde se remet peu à peu de l’échec d’une aventure sentimentale pour laquelle il s’était décidé à quitter sa femme. Malgré l’imminence du désastre, et peut-être pour mieux y faire face, il s’élance dans une véritable odyssée amoureuse qui l’entraîne sur les routes de France et d’Espagne.

You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet

From beyond the grave, celebrated playwright Antoine d’Anthac gathers together all his friends who have appeared over the years in his play “Eurydice”. These actors watch a recording of the work performed by a young acting company, La Compagnie de la Colombe. Do love, life, death and love after death still have any place on a theater stage? It’s up to them to decide. And the surprises have only just begun… [Synopsis courtesy of official Cannes website]

Cosmopolis

Riding across Manhattan in a stretch limo in order to get a haircut, a 28-year-old billionaire asset manager’s day devolves into an odyssey with a cast of characters that start to tear his world apart.

Les Herbes folles (Wild Grass)

Marguerite loses her wallet, and it’s found by Georges, a seemingly happy head of family. As he looks through the wallet and examines the photos of Marguerite, he finds he’s fascinated with her and her life, and soon his curiosity about her becomes an obsession.

Visage (Face)

Apparently commissioned by the Louvre Museum, according to Wildgrounds.com its “a variation of St John the Baptist and Oscar Wilde’s Salome. Starring Laetitia Casta, Jean-Pierre Léaud… Sounds very French Nouvelle Vague!”

Camille redouble

Noémie Lvovsky’s ebullient twist on the comedy of remarriage transposes Frances Ford Coppola’s Peggy Sue Got Married to present day France, which means that when the titular Camille—who’s in the throes of divorcing her husband of 25 years—passes out drunk, she wakes up as a high school senior in the mid-1980s (leg warmers, “Walking on Sunshine” on the turntable, and no cell phones in sight.)

Mesrine: Public Enemy No. 1 (L’ennemi public n°1)

The story of Jacques Mesrine, France’s public enemy No. 1 during the 1970s. After nearly two decades of legendary criminal feats — from multiple bank robberies and to prison breaks — Mesrine was gunned down by the French police in Paris. [Synopsis courtesy IMDb]