Now You See Me 2

One year after outwitting the FBI and winning the public’s adulation with their mind-bending spectacles, the Four Horsemen resurface in Now You See Me: The Second Act only to find themselves face to face with a new enemy who enlists them to pull off their most dangerous heist yet.

Last Orders

Jack Dodd was a London butcher who enjoyed a pint with his mates for over 50 years. When he died, he died as he lived, with a smile on his face watching a horse race on which he had bet, with borrowed money. But before he died he had a final request, ‘Last Orders’, that his ashes be scattered in the sea at Margate. The movie follows his mates, Ray, Lenny and Vic and his foster son Vince as they journey to the sea with the ashes. Along the way, the threads of their lives, their loves and their disappointments are woven together in their memories of Jack and his wife Amy

Now You See Me

Four magicians each answer a mysterious summons to an obscure address with secrets inside. A year later, they are the Four Horseman, big time stage illusionists who climax their sold out Las Vegas show with a bank apparently robbed for real. This puts agents Dylan Rhodes of the FBI and Alma Vargas of Interpol on the case to find out how they did it. However, this mystery proves difficult to solve even with the insights of the professional illusion exposer, Thaddeus Bradley. What follows is a bizarre investigation where nothing is what it seems with illusions, dark secrets and hidden agendas galore as all involved are reminded of a great truth in this puzzle: the closer you look, the less you see.


Dom Cobb, a skilled thief who commits corporate espionage by infiltrating the subconscious of his targets is offered a chance to regain his old life as payment for a task considered to be impossible: “inception”, the implantation of another person’s idea into a target’s subconscious.

Harry Brown

Michael Caine is Harry Brown. If that sentence carries a hint of action-movie menace, it’s not entirely misplaced. Caine’s Harry is eventually roused to awesome and satisfying vengeance, but this film begins in more troubling, nuanced territory.

Harry Brown lives alone, shut away in one of Britain’s bleak public-housing apartment blocks. As his wife lives out her last days in the hospital, Harry restricts his activities to games of chess in the pub with Leonard, his last best friend. All around them swarms chaos. Their housing estate has been taken over by warring gangs that deal drugs and settle scores with impunity. The police, represented here by upright detective Frampton (Emily Mortimer) and her cynical partner Hicock (Charlie Creed-Miles), are reduced to simply informing the victims’ families when the latest shooting or knifing occurs – visits that Hicock calls death-o-grams. [Synopsis courtesy of TIFF]

The Dark Knight Rises

Following the death of District Attorney Harvey Dent, Batman assumes responsibility for Dent’s crimes to protect the late attorney’s reputation and is subsequently hunted by the Gotham City Police Department. Eight years later, Batman encounters the mysterious Selina Kyle and the villainous Bane, a new terrorist leader who overwhelms Gotham’s finest. The Dark Knight resurfaces to protect a city that has branded him an enemy.

Is Anybody There?

In his follow up to last year’s “Boy A,” John Crowley returns to the world of a young boy, fashioning a film of a very different kind. Infusing his new work with the childish naïveté of a precocious and curious lad named Edward – played by “Son of Rambow’s” Bill Milner – Crowley enters this terrain with the same ease that was evident in his earlier work. But while “Boy A” was a study of a young ex-criminal, the protagonist of “Is There Anybody There?” is younger and more guileless. Although his interests are indeed uncommon, they are those of a boy as opposed to a haunted teenager. [Synopsis courtesy of the Toronto International Film Festival]

The Muppet Christmas Carol

A retelling of the classic Dickens tale of Ebenezer Scrooge, miser extraordinaire. He is held accountable for his dastardly ways during night-time visitations by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and future.

Youth (2015)

Fred and Mick, two old friends approaching their eighties, are enjoying a vacation in a lovely hotel in the foothills of the Alps. Fred, a retired composer and conductor, has no intention of returning to his music career which he dropped a long time ago, while Mick, a director, is still working, hurrying to finish the screenplay of his latest film. Both friends know that their days are numbered and decide to face their future together. But unlike them, no one else seems worried about the passing of time… [Synopsis courtesy of Cannes Film Festival]

Danny Collins

Inspired by a true story, Al Pacino stars as aging 1970s rocker Danny Collins, who can’t give up his hard-living ways. But when his manager (Christopher Plummer) uncovers a 40 year-old undelivered letter written to him by John Lennon, he decides to change course and embarks on a heartfelt journey to rediscover his family, find true love and begin a second act.

Kingsman: The Secret Service

The Secret Service tells the story of a super-secret spy organization that recruits an unrefined but promising street kid into the agency’s ultra-competitive training program just as a global threat emerges from a twisted tech genius.