Where Do We Go Now? (Et maintenant on va ou?)

On the edge of a cratered road, a cortège-like procession of women solemnly makes its way towards the village cemetery. Takla, Amale, Yvonne, Afaf and Saydeh stoically brave the oppressive midday heat, clutching photographic effigies of their beloved menfolk, lost to a futile, protracted and distant war. Some of the women are veiled, others bear wooden crosses, but all are clad in black and united by a sense of shared grief. As they arrive at the cemetery gates, the procession divides into two congregations; one Muslim, the other Christian.

Set against the backdrop of a war-torn country, “Where do we go now?” tells the heart-warming tale of a group of women’s determination to protect their isolated, mine-encircled, community from the pervasive and divisive outside forces that threaten to destroy it from within.

United by a common cause, the women’s unwavering friendship transcends, against all the odds, the religious fault lines which crisscross their society and they hatch some extraordinarily inventive, and oftentimes comical, plans in order to distract the village’s menfolk and defuse any sign of inter-religious tension.

A series of chaotic incidents tests the women’s ingenuity as they manage, with sass, to successfully stave off the fall-out from the distant war. But when events take a tragic turn, just how far will the women go in order to prevent bloodshed and turmoil? [Synopsis courtesy of Cannes Film Festival]

The Idol

Inspired by the true story of Mohammed Assaf, THE IDOL follows the hopes and dreams of the 22-year-old young refugee from Gaza who dreams of the world hearing his voice and singing in the Cairo Opera House. Somehow he manages to escape out of Gaza and make it to the Cairo auditions of Arab Idol, the most popular talent show in the region. He gets to the latter stages of the competition, where he must confront his own fears to take control of his destiny and bring hope and happiness to an entire region.

Where Do We Go Now?

On a remote, isolated, unnamed Lebanese village inhabited by both Muslims and Christians. The village is surrounded by land mines and only reachable by a small bridge. As civil strife engulfed the country, the women in the village learn of this fact and try, by various means and to varying success, to keep their men in the dark, sabotaging the village radio, then destroying the village TV.

Rock the Casbah (2013)

A bittersweet comedy that plays out around a family coming to terms with grief, disclosures, secrets and reckoning, Rock the Casbah follows one family during the three days of mourning called for by Moroccan custom, as they reunite in their deceased patriarch’s villa. When youngest daughter, Sofia, arrives unexpectedly, sparks start to fly. She left for America — against her father’s wishes — to become a successful actress, but she only ever landed roles in TV series playing terrorists. Secrets come out, throwing the order once maintained by their patriarch into turmoil.