Tomorrow, When the War Began

Based on the first of seven books by acclaimed Australian author, John Marsden, Tomorrow When The War Began is the story of seven teenagers who return from a week-long camping trip to find that Australia has been invaded by a foreign power. Banding together to fight gurellia-style agaist the enemy, this is not a typical heroic war movie – it is a terrifying situation where they must sometimes use little more than a knife or a belt to murder a soldier in cold blood. It’s a graphic tale of the violence, the blood, the fear, and the insanity of war. These kids are underdogs, they’re not going to win the war, they’re more likely to end up dead in a ditch than send the enemy retreating, but it’s their land, their parents and friends in prison camps. They give a damn and they’d rather die fighting than give up.

Solomon Kane

Spend your life cutting men down with your blade and robbing them of their wealth, and word of your exploits is sure to reach the devil, who is always on the lookout for new souls. Meet Solomon Kane, the invention of Robert E. Howard, the legendary creator of Conan the Barbarian. Howard published his sword-and-sorcery stories in the Depression-era pulp magazine Weird Tales, and his influence on the fantasy genre is rivalled only by J. R. R. Tolkien. [Synopsis courtesy of TIFF]

Dorian Gray

When the handsome and naive Dorian (Barnes) arrives in Victorian London, he befriends the charismatic Lord Henry Wotton (Firth), who introduces him to a world of excess. For Henry, the only things worth pursuing in life are beauty and fulfillment of the senses, views he imparts to Dorian together with a good deal of flattery.

Women are enamoured of Dorian’s youthful countenance, but so is artist Basil Hallward (Ben Chaplin), a friend of Henry’s who paints Dorian’s portrait, aiming to capture all the power and allure of physical beauty. Overtaken with his own vanity, Dorian decides he would rather sell his soul than see himself age another day. Soon after, just such a deal presents itself, with the stipulation that every sin marked upon his soul would render itself visible on Basil’s painting. Disregarding consequences, Dorian descends into debauchery. He seduces the beautiful performer Sibyl Vane (Rachel Hurd-Wood) and then abandons her. He woos a host of stunning women, attends erotically charged costume parties and indulges in whatever fancy suits his whim. Yet Dorian is continually haunted by the true nature of his appearance. [Synopsis courtesy of TIFF]