3 Backyards

A trio of brief, yet potentially life-altering, adventures unfold on one seemingly normal autumn day. In a complacent suburban neighborhood, an emotionally troubled businessman (Elias Koteas) wanders around his hometown while waiting for a delayed flight, a starstruck housewife (Edie Falco) embarks on an peculiar trip when she gives her famous neighbor a ride to the local ferry, and an eight-year-old girl takes a wrong turn on the way to school and finds herself in an unexpected adult realm.

Eric Mendelsohn (Judy Berlin—Sundance Film Festival 1999) shapes an intense and detailed domestic drama of quiet suspense. With its unconventional visual style, 3 Backyards looks and feels like a film from another time—possibly the past or the near future. Its identifiable characters and often painfully human scenarios work in tandem to pry out unsettling emotional truths of our times—creating a memorable story of turning points in these three lives. [Synopsis courtesy of Sundance Film Festival]

The Escort

The Escort begins as a story of two 20-somethings using one another for professional gain. Mitch, a sex-obsessed journalist, convinces Natalie, a Stanford-educated prostitute, to allow him to follow her around for an exposé he’s writing for a magazine. While initially hesitant to allow him into her life, Natalie eventually sees an upside for herself and (unbeknownst to Mitch) starts using him as a bodyguard to protect her from the assorted personalities she deals with on a nightly basis. What starts out as just business soon develops into a strong friendship, as the two discover their lives are more fulfilled together. [Synopsis courtesy of LA Film Festival]