Last Orders

Jack Dodd was a London butcher who enjoyed a pint with his mates for over 50 years. When he died, he died as he lived, with a smile on his face watching a horse race on which he had bet, with borrowed money. But before he died he had a final request, ‘Last Orders’, that his ashes be scattered in the sea at Margate. The movie follows his mates, Ray, Lenny and Vic and his foster son Vince as they journey to the sea with the ashes. Along the way, the threads of their lives, their loves and their disappointments are woven together in their memories of Jack and his wife Amy

44 Inch Chest

Ray Winstone, Ian McShane, John Hurt, Tom Wilkinson, Stephen Dillane, and Joanne Whalley star in first time feature filmmaker Malcolm Venville’s darkly comic tale of a man who rallies his friends in order to seek revenge against the French waiter who recently slept with his wife. Sexy Beast scribes Louis Mellis and David Scinto pen the screenplay for a film produced by Richard Brown and Steve Golin. [Synopsis courtesy of Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide]


Hugo is an orphan boy living in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. He learned to fix clocks and other gadgets from his father and uncle which he puts to use keeping the train station clocks running. The only thing that he has left that connects him to his dead father is an automaton (mechanical man) that doesn’t work without a special key which Hugo needs to find to unlock the secret he believes it contains. On his adventures, he meets with a shopkeeper, George Melies, who works in the train station and his adventure-seeking god-daughter. Hugo finds that they have a surprising connection to his father and the automaton, and he discovers it unlocks some memories the old man has buried inside regarding his past.

Snow White and the Huntsman

After the Evil Queen marries the King, she performs a violent coup in which the King is murdered and his daughter, Snow White, is taken captive. Almost a decade later, a grown Snow White is still in the clutches of the Queen. In order to obtain immortality, The Evil Queen needs the heart of Snow White. After Snow escapes the castle, the Queen sends the Huntsman to find her in the Dark Forest.

The Sweeney

Based on the ’70s UK TV show, The Sweeney is an action-packed British police thriller from the director of Football Factory. Jack Regan (Ray Winstone), a hardened cop who doesn’t play by the rules, is confronted with a criminal from his past. With sidekick George Carter (Ben Drew aka Plan B) they are put on the case of a jewellery store heist that ends in a killing. But is that killing really an execution in disguise? With pressure from his boss and the fact that Regan is having an affair with that boss’s wife, it’s not going to be easy for him to stay out of trouble.


From British director Ian Sharp comes an impressive film following a Maori man on the run from a group of English officers across the stunning New Zealand wilderness. Taking place in 1902 just after the Second Boer War, this story reveals much about colonialism and the unlikely friendships that can be struck between hunters and their prey.

Tracker begins with the story of Arjan (Ray Winstone), one of thousands of Dutch settlers who fled South Africa to Commonwealth countries after fighting against the British at the turn of the 20th century. After Maori Kereama (Temeura Morrison) is wrongly thought to have killed a British officer, he is forced to flee to the countryside. Following his trail is Arjan and a group of bloodthirsty officers, who would each like their share of the reward offered for Kereama’s capture. But when Arjan, an experienced tracker, takes his own route in an effort to find Kereama, new affinities are forged between the most unlikely of characters. Because both Arjan and Kereama lost their respective wars to the British, they eventually find common ground in their mutual sense of anger and loss.

Shot on location in New Zealand and featuring magnificent vistas, the film’s wild, striking landscapes offer a stark contrast to the violence of colonialism present throughout the film. More than simply a lesson in colonial history, “Tracker” is a meditation on victimhood and transcendence. “Tracker” encourages viewers to consider what their own histories share with the persecuted individuals in the film. The New Zealand countryside provides the ideal backdrop for pondering the lives of these men and for contemplating what recourse they have to justice and healing. [Synopsis courtesy of Jane Schoettle/Toronto International Film Festival]


A naive young man assumes a dead man’s identity and finds himself embroiled in an underground world of power, violence, and chance where men gamble behind closed doors on the lives of other men.


When Rango, a lost family pet, accidentally winds up in the gritty, gun-slinging town of Dirt, the less-than-courageous lizard suddenly finds he stands out. Welcomed as the last hope the town has been waiting for, new Sheriff Rango is forced to play his new role to the hilt.

London Boulevard

“London Boulevard” is the story of a man newly released from prison who falls in love with a reclusive young movie star and finds himself in a duel with a vicious gang

Barney Thomson

Barney Thomson, awkward, diffident, Glasgow barber, lives a life of desperate mediocrity and his uninteresting life is about to go from 0 to 60 in five seconds, as he enters the grotesque and comically absurd world of the serial killer.

Point Break

A young undercover FBI agent infiltrates a gang of thieves who share a common interest in extreme sports. A remake of the 1991 film, “Point Break”.

The Gunman

An international operative named Martin Terrier wants out of the game, so he can settle down with his longtime love. The organization he works for has other plans in mind, and he is forced to go on the run across Europe