This Is Martin Bonner

Two men, at opposite ends of the social spectrum, find themselves starting new lives in the same, small town and form an unlikely friendship.

Take Shelter

Plagued by a series of apocalyptic visions, a young husband and father questions whether to shelter his family from a coming storm, or from himself.

Septien

A reclusive sports hustler returns home to his family farm after years of absence to reunite with his two eccentric, unhinged and emotionally damaged brothers.

The Oregonian

A girl gets in a car accident and wanders through the woods, encountering all kinds of nightmarish things.

The Catechism Cataclysm

Father William Smoortser drops his bible into a toilet at a rest stop just before embarking on a day-long canoe trip, breaking loose all glorious hell.

Nature Calls

Polar-opposite brothers Randy and Kirk never saw eye-to-eye, but their rivalry is taken to a new level when Randy hijacks Kirk’s son’s sleepover, taking the boys on a Scout Trip to remember.

Rainbow Time

Todd grew up under the strange shadow of his older mentally challenged brother Shonzi. As kids, Shonzi forced Todd to make action movies. As adults he pressures him to share love life details, even showing Shonzi a sex tape he made with an old girlfriend to help him cope when family tragedy hits. When their dad suffers a heart attack, Shonzi (now 40, and still a virgin) moves in with Todd and his new girlfriend Lindsay. Shonzi wants desperately to be included in their relationship like old times. When Shonzi’s begging become threats to reveal secrets from their past, Todd must find the courage to be honest with Lindsay, even if it means the end of their relationship. [Synopsis courtesy of SXSW]

The Missing Girl

A schlubby, disillusioned comic-book store owner revisits an adolescent trauma when his beautiful young employee suddenly goes missing, in this combination of quirky comedy and bittersweet, late-in-life coming-of-age story. [Synopsis courtesy of TIFF}

Sabbatical

After his mother suffers a stroke, Ben Hardin returns to his rural hometown to care for her and complete his most recent book. While home, his relationships with family and friends are strained and tested.

Congratulations!

As a member of Missing Persons unit, Detective Skok realizes the first 72 hours are the most critical in any investigation. When a young boy goes missing inside his own house, Skok immediately recognizes the unusualness of the case and takes the opportunity to have his team move in with the family and become residents of the crime scene. What follows is an absurd and comic investigation that leaves no stone unturned, no family member un-interrogated…and no wall without an entire wallpaper made up of missing posters. An edgy and sometimes surreal comedy, director Mike Brune infuses his visionary directorial debut with eccentric characters, mind games, and dry wit.

Thou Wast Mild and Lovely

A farm in rural Kentucky. Father Jeremiah and daughter Sarah squabble together like young puppies. Over crisp, verdant images of nature, of animals, streams and puddles, a mysterious, sensual female voice tells of her lover, who may be a person or may be the whole world. Enter Akin, there to help out for the summer. He’s left his wife and child at home – and taken off his wedding ring as a precaution. Soon the three of them are circling each other, watching, feeling watched and knowing that their watching is not going unwatched. Within this atmosphere, a charged romance develops between Sarah and Akin that carries both an erotic tension and vague feeling of menace. When Akin’s wife Drew comes for a visit, the situation explodes, harmless fantasies giving way to a violent nightmare. [Synopsis courtesy of Berlinale]

She’s Lost Control

Ronah works as a sexual surrogate, teaching inhibited men what they fear most: intimacy. Her clients are referred to her by a psychotherapist. She and one of their number casually make the bed where they will sleep together; later on she lets him show her his new business idea on his laptop as if they were best friends. Such scenes are interspersed with hotel hallways, claustrophobic shots of Manhattan’s urban canyons, hassles with workmen, cries for help from Ronah’s brother she chooses to ignore, even as he tells her that their mother has disappeared. It is impossible to identify when exactly she loses control. She’s clearly not been able to get a handle on her new, auto-aggressive client Johnny with his soft voice, his intelligence, his occasional mocking remarks. She starts to fall in love with him instead. [Synopsis courtesy of Berlinale]