Dying Laughing

A stand-up comedian is his or her own writer, director and star performer. Unlike any other art form, there is no safety net. In its singular realization, comedy thrives on a stage—often in front of hostile audiences. For most people, baring your soul and being heckled would be a life-changing trauma. For stand-ups, it’s just part of the routine.


Breakaway is a cross-cultural hockey drama set in the Indo-Canadian community in suburban Toronto, Canada. It‟s also a keenly observed cross-cultural drama with a hero caught between a family‟s traditional expectations and a dream to make it big in the national sport of an adopted country. Breakaway is a fun, action-filled sports comedy bringing a dash of Bollywood entertainment to Canada‟s favorite sport. [Synopsis courtesy of TIFF]

Source Code

Decorated soldier Captain Colter Stevens wakes up in the body of an unknown man, discovering he’s involved in a mission to find the bomber of a Chicago commuter train. He learns he’s part of a top-secret experimental program that enables him to experience the final 8 minutes of another person’s life. Colter re-lives the train incident over and over again, gathering more clues each time. But can he discover who is responsible for the attack before the next one happens?

Girl In Progress

Grace (Mendes) is a single mom. She is too busy juggling work, bills, and the very married Dr. Hartford (Matthew Modine), to give her daughter, Ansiedad (Ramirez) the attention she desperately needs. When Ansiedad’s English teacher, Ms. Armstrong (Patricia Arquette), introduces her students to classic coming-of-age stories, Ansiedad is inspired to skip adolescence and jump-start her life without mom. While Grace becomes preoccupied with the increasing affections of her co-worker (Eugenio Derbez), Ansiedad enlists the help of her loyal friend, Tavita (Raini Rodriguez), to plot her shortcut to “adulthood”. But as her misguided plan unravels, Ansiedad and Grace must learn that sometimes growing-up means acting your age.

Being Canadian

When Calgarian Robert Cohen moved to L.A. to pursue his dreams of becoming a comedy writer, he quickly realized that his new friends and colleagues knew nothing but the usual stereotypes about his beloved homeland. After years of frustration, Robert decided to embark on a personal quest, traveling from one end of Canada to the other, to prove BEING CANADIAN is more than just maple syrup and Mounties. Imagine “Sherman’s March” or “Roger and Me”, but wearing a toque.