In 1970s Iran, Marjane ‘Marji’ Statrapi watches events through her young eyes and her idealistic family of a long dream being fulfilled of the hated Shah’s defeat in the Iranian Revolution of 1979. However as Marji grows up, she witnesses first hand how the new Iran, now ruled by Islamic fundamentalists, has become a repressive tyranny on its own.

The Army of Crime

Paris, 1941. The poet Missak Manouchian leads a mixed bag of youngsters and émigrés in a clandestine battle against the Nazi occupation. Twenty-two men and one woman fighting for an ideal and for freedom. News of their daring attacks, including the assassination of an SS General, eventually reaches Berlin. Under the orders of the Gestapo, French police and collaborators hound Manouchian and his Résistants until, to escape torture, one of their associates denounces the whole group. After a show trial, the twenty-three heroes are brought to face a firing squad… [Synopsis courtesy of the Festival de Cannes]

The Wedding Song

Set in WWII Tunis as the Nazis are about to occupy the capital, “The Wedding Song” is the story of the powerful friendship between Nour (Olympe Borval) and Myriam (Lizzie Brochere), two Muslim and Jewish adolescent girls who live in the same quarters of the old city and have been close friends since childhood. In spite of their intimacy and shared aspirations, each girl seems to secretly desire the other’s life: while Nour regrets that she doesn’t go to school, Myriam dreams of passion and envies Nour’s recent engagement to her handsome cousin Khaled. With rising political upheaval, the friends are gradually drawn apart as they pick sides in a battle they had never considered before, but the more they grow apart, the more they need each other.

Don’t Tell Me the Boy Was Mad

In the 80s, Aram, a young man from Marseille of Armenian origin, blows up the Turkish ambassador’s car in Paris. Gilles Tessier, a young cyclist who was passing at that moment, is seriously injured.
Aram, on the run, joins the Armenian Liberation Army in Beirut, the hotbed of international revolution in those years.
Gilles is trying to understand when Anouch, Aram’s mother, arrives in his hospital room to beg his forgiveness. She admits that her son planted the bomb. Aram clashes with his comrades in Beirut and decides to meet his victim to make him his spokesman… [Synopsis courtesy of Cannes Film Festival]


Exactly 100 years after the Armenian Genocide in Ottoman Turkey, a mysterious director (Simon Abkarian) is staging a play at the Los Angeles Theatre to honor the victims of that tragedy – a horrifying crime forgotten and denied for an entire century. But as protesters surround his theatre, and a series of strange accidents spread panic among his producer (Jim Piddock) and actors (Angela Sarafyan, Sam Page, Nikolai Kinski), it appears that the director’s mission is profoundly dangerous, and the ghosts of the past are everywhere.

The Cut

German-Turkish director Fatih Akin’s epic drama about one man’s journey through the Ottoman Empire after surviving the 1915 Armenian genocide. Deported from his home in Mardin, young blacksmith Nazareth (Tahar Rahim) moves onwards as a forced laborer. After managing to survive the horrors of the genocide, he hears that his twin daughters are still alive; his hope is revived and he sets off to track them down, his search taking him from the Mesopotamian deserts and Havana to the barren and desolate prairies of North Dakota. On this odyssey, he encounters a range of very different people: angelic and kind-hearted characters, but also the devil incarnate.

Gett, The Trial of Viviane Amsalem

In Israel there is neither civil marriage nor civil divorce. Only rabbis can legitimate a marriage or its dissolution. But this dissolution is only possible with full consent from the husband, who in the end has more power that the judges.
Viviane Amsalem has been applying for divorce for three years.
But her husband Elisha will not agree. His cold intransigence, Viviane’s determination to fight for her freedom, and the ambiguous role of the judges shape a procedure in which tragedy vies with absurdity, and everything is brought out for judgment, apart from the initial request. [Synopsis courtesy of Director’s Fortnight]


She is a scientist. He is a Lebanese doctor. They meet at a banquet and fall into a carefree, passionate relationship. But difficulties abound because of his heritage and her loveless marriage. She flies to Havana to sort things out on the beach and in the cabarets. She sends him a ticket, but harbors no illusions that He will join her in this Caribbean melting pot.