Secret Sunshine

Sin-ae moves with her son Jun to Miryang, the town where her dead husband was born. As she tries to come to herself and set out on new foundations, another tragic event overturns her life.

Thirst (Bakjwi)

Acclaimed director Park Chan-wook returns with his highly anticipated vampire film Thirst, an official selection at the 62nd Cannes Film Festival. Everyone’s favorite actor Song Kang Ho plays a respected priest who turns into a vampire after a medical experiment gone wrong. His newfound thirst for blood and deadly attraction for his best friend’s wife drives him down a road of lust and depravity.

The Face Reader

Nae-kyung, the most skillful face reader in Joseon dynasty, was living in seclusion when he was offered a lucrative partnership by Yeon-hong, a Korean geisha. Nae-kyung accepts the proposal to read the faces of Yeon-hong’s guests only to get involved in a murder case. With his face reading skills, Nae-kyung successfully identifies the murderer and his skills are soon acknowledged by King Moonjong who orders him to identify the potential traitors who threaten his reign. However after the unexpected death of Moonjong, Nae-kyung is courted by Grand Prince Sooyang who yearns to become King himself by killing the young successor Danjong. Nae-kyung decides to keep his loyalty to the late King and help KIM Jong-seo protect the young King which forces him into the biggest power struggle in the history of the Joseon dynasty.

Snowpiercer

When Bong Joon-ho first opened Jean-Marc Rochette’s comic ‘Snowpiercer’ in a Seoul bookshop, he supposedly devoured all three volumes on the spot. Eight years later, the French comic has been made into the most lavish Korean film of all time, a parable on the final days of humankind. Seolguk-yeolcha describes an impending ice age caused by human hand, whose last survivors are left circling the earth in a nonstop express train. The rich are in the front carriages and the poor – from whose perspective the story is told – at the back.
If you walk along a moving train from back to front, you end up travelling faster than the train itself relative to the Earth. This is the dynamic force upon which Bong’s film thrives: there’s only one direction in which this revolt can go and it’ll be doomed to failure if its speed doesn’t exceed the reaction. With its impressive cast, breath-taking artificial landscapes, fantastic make-up, over-the-top décor, fresh, witty dialogue and a healthy portion of humour, Bong Joon-ho gives back to cinema what the Lumière brothers themselves already used to impress their audiences: the sheer force of the machine. [Synopsis courtesy of Berlinale]

Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance

This is the story of Ryu, a deaf man, and his sister, who requires a kidney transplant. Ryu’s boss, Park, has just laid him off, and in order to afford the transplant, Ryu and his girlfriend develop a plan to kidnap Park’s daughter. Things go horribly wrong, and the situation spirals rapidly into a cycle of violence and revenge.

Memories of Murder

1986 Gyunggi Province. The body of a young woman is found brutally raped and murdered. Two months later, a series of rapes and murders commences under similar circumstances. And in a country that had never known such crimes, the dark whispers about a serial murderer grow louder. A special task force is set up in the area, with two local detectives Park Doo-Man and Jo Young-Goo joined by a detective from Seoul who requested to be assigned to the case. Based on a true story that occurred in Hwaseong, Gyeonggi Province over the course of six years (1986 – 1991). 10 women were raped and murdered in a 2km radius ranging from a 71 year-old grandmother to a 13 year old schoolgirl. Over 3,000 suspects were interrogated and at least 300,000 police took part in the massive investigation. Not a single person was indicted for the crimes.