J’ai tué ma mère (I Killed My Mother)

In a triple-threat feat, Dolan writes, directs and stars in J’ai tué ma mère, the semi-autobiographical tale of a young gay man coming of age while struggling with his tortured relationship with his mother.

Dolan plays Hubert, a cool and composed teenager who sports a Tears for Fears throwback hairdo. He bickers constantly with mom (Anne Dorval) about anything and everything, from the trivial to the profound. He’s also repulsed by her style – the plastic on the furniture, her repeated trips to the tanning salon. Not only is she disagreeable and unsupportive, but she’s also a kitsch monster. Their arguments are alternately hilarious and horrifying, reflecting the profound pain both mother and son are suffering through. When his teacher asks the class to write about what their mother does, Hubert can’t imagine even acknowledging he has one – so he writes that his mother is dead, managing to bury her in at least one part of his imagination.

Their fights escalate until mom hatches a toxic plan: Hubert will be shipped off to boarding school. He is aghast but has little choice, as mom has managed to convince her ex-husband that a change of scenery is in the lad’s best interests. Being banished to a mother-free zone might have seemed a good option for Hubert, but the move simply leads to an ultimate standoff between them. Dolan and Dorval navigate their way through the harried, increasingly vicious tête-à-têtes with delicacy, evoking sympathy for both characters. [Synopsis courtesy of the TIFF]

Laurence Anyways

The story of impossible love between a man and a woman after the man decided to have a sex change.

To Life (À la vie)

Helen, Lili and Rose met in Auschwitz, where the three twenty-year-old Jewish girls were deported. Thanks to German-speaking Dutch Lili, who was working in the camp kitchen, the two French girls survived. However, after the liberation of the camp, they lost touch. Lili went back to the Netherlands. Rose married a former deportee and settled down in Canada. Helen returned alone to France where she met an old childhood sweetheart and married him, aware of his impotency caused by sinister doctors carrying out experiments on him in the concentration camp. Determined to find her old companions, Helen puts an ad in a deportees’ newspaper. Against all odds the ad is answered and the women are reunited. The reunion takes place in Berck Plage in the north of France. The women rediscover each other, as well as help each other to overcome their Auschwitz demons.

The Other Half (2016)

Nickie is a self-destructive loner ever mourning the disappearance of his younger brother. Having abandoned a life of promise in his native UK, he has subsisted by drowning grief in alcohol and violence. On the fifth anniversary of his brother’s disappearance – and on the verge of reaching his nadir – he meets Emily. The two form an immediate, inseparable bond: it is a love at first sight deepened by a shared sense of sorrow. [Synopsis courtesy of SXSW]

My Internship in Canada

An independent M.P. suddenly finds himself thrust into the parliamentary spotlight, and it’s up to his young Haitian intern to help the hapless backbencher navigate the complexities and pitfalls of Parliament Hill. [Synopsis courtesy of TIFF]

Sitting On The Edge Of Marlene

SITTING ON THE EDGE OF MARLENE is a darkly comedic feature film drama that centers on a mother-daughter con artist duo. An adaptation of the Billie Livingston novella titled The Trouble With Marlene, it is a bittersweet and emotional journey that deals with dysfunction, love and addiction and ends with an unusual deliverance for the compelling mother and daughter duo.


An aging Roman Catholic Priest living contentedly at a Niagara Falls parish, receives a letter forcing his complacent life into a downward spiral.


Three friends go on a fishing trip. Well … that’s what everyone believes.


A widowed single mom finds herself burdened with the full-time custody of her explosive 15-year-old ADHD son. As they try to make ends meet and struggle with their impetuous and unpredictable ménage, the new girl across the street, Kyla, benevolently offers needed support. Together, they find a new sense of balance, and hope is regained. [Synopsis courtesy of Cannes Film Festival]