It’s Only the End of the World

After 12 years of absence, a writer goes back to his hometown, planning on annoucing his upcoming death to his family. As resentment soon rewrites the course of the afternoon, fits and feuds unfold, fuelled by loneliness and doubt, while all attempts of empathy are sabotaged by people’s incapacity to listen and love. [Synopsis courtesy of Cannes Film Festival]

Ocean’s Twelve

Danny Ocean reunites with his old flame and the rest of his merry band of thieves in a caper concerning three huge heists in Rome, Paris and Amsterdam. But Europol agent Isabel Lahiri is hot on their heels.


Trance follows an art heist that goes wrong when the heist’s leader receives a blow to the head during one operation, and begins to suffer from amnesia – the location of a painting they’ve nicked is a mystery.

A Dangerous Method

Viggo Mortensen and Michael Fassbender star in director David Cronenberg’s adaptation of Christopher Hampton’s play detailing the deteriorating relationship between Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. The year is 1904. Carl Jung (Fassbender), a disciple of Sigmund Freud (Mortensen), is using Freudian techniques to treat Russian-Jewish psychiatric patient Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley) at Burgh”lzli Mental Hospital. But the deeper Jung’s relationship with Spielrein grows, the further the burgeoning psychiatrist and his highly respected mentor drift apart. As Jung struggles to help his patient overcome some pressing paternal issues, disturbed patient Otto Gross (Vincent Cassel) sets out to test the boundaries of the doctor’s professional resolve.

Our Day Will Come (Notre jour viendra)

Redheaded teen Remy (Olivier Barthelemy) is bullied by his soccer teammates and drawn into fights with his younger sister and mother in their cramped apartment. After a flare-up of domestic violence, he flees home and is tracked down by a bitter guidance counsellor, Patrick (Vincent Cassel), also a redhead. Patrick looks upon Remy’s sullen insolence with both sympathy and disdain and decides to toughen him up. The two redheads realize that they are out of place in twenty-first century France. They have no country, no people and no army. Together they plot to take on the world in a hallucinatory quest for a land of imagined freedom.

À Deriva (Adrift)

Spending summer vacation with her family in Buzios, Filipa, a fourteen-year old girl, suffers through the rite of passage into adulthood while discovering love for the first time. A rite filled with anguish when she learns that her father, a famous author, is betraying her mother with a foreign woman who lives in the small seaside town. But, this secret is to be only the first in a series of others, both enchanting and painful, which she discovers about her family and herself as well. [Synopsis courtesy of Cannes Film Festival]

Mesrine: Public Enemy No. 1 (L’ennemi public n°1)

The story of Jacques Mesrine, France’s public enemy No. 1 during the 1970s. After nearly two decades of legendary criminal feats — from multiple bank robberies and to prison breaks — Mesrine was gunned down by the French police in Paris. [Synopsis courtesy IMDb]

Black Swan

A psychological thriller set in the world of New York City Ballet, BLACK SWAN stars Natalie Portman as Nina, a featured dancer who finds herself locked in a web of competitive intrigue with a new rival at the company (Mila Kunis). The film takes a thrilling and at times terrifying journey through the psyche of a young ballerina whose starring role as the duplicitous swan queen turns out to be a part for which she becomes frighteningly perfect.

Jason Bourne

The fifth film in the Bourne franchise, and the first featuring Jason Bourne since The Bourne Ultimatum.

La Haine

When he was just 29 years old, Matthieu Kassovitz took the international film world by storm with La Haine (Hate), a gritty, unsettling, and visually explosive look at the racial and cultural volatility in modern-day France, specifically in the low-income banlieue districts on Paris’s outskirts. Aimlessly whiling away their days in the concrete environs of their dead-end suburbia, Vinz, Hubert, and Said — a Jew, African, and an Arab — give human faces to France’s immigrant populations, their bristling resentment at their social marginalization slowly simmering until it reaches a climactic boiling point. A work of tough beauty, La Haine is a landmark of contemporary French cinema and a gripping reflection of its country’s ongoing identity crisis.